Whether an External Stimulus Can Decrease an Individuals Memory

Both the control and experiment group subjects were each given a minute to view the tray with loud music playing next to them. The number of items remembered was recorded down. The results from the data collected show that external stimulus affects one’s memory performance with (P=.045).
Distractions and in particular loud noise have varying effects on memory performance.
Various studies have indicated that loud noise distractions have both positive and negative affect on memory performance depending on its frequency (Agnes, H 2004). Others have come with the conclusions that distractions have no effect on a memory’s performance.
A larger number of studies involving tasks that primarily use short term memory has shown that exposure to loud noise significantly affects memory performance more (Baker et al. 1993). This is attributed to the fact that distractions will act to avert the degree of concentration.
To begin with, a study by Dwivedi’s (1988) proves that, loud noise distractions influence memory performance. In this experiment, students were required to memorize some English words as their teacher spelt them. The teacher repeated them several times with a different music volume playing and the number of those that a student could remember against the sound strength was recorded. Results indicated that high-intensity noise was significantly detrimental in memory performance than low noise.
In addition, Winkler, L et al. (1996) agreed with Dwivedi. They examined the effects of radio noise during classwork where students were required to read and answer some simple questions with a radio on during class. The question was again administered to the same students with the radio on. On marking the question and comparing the two performances, it was evident to them that, the performance with the radio on was not the expected Winkler, L et al. (1996) concluded that sounds affected the degree of remembrance.