Themes of Huckleberry Finn

Freedom and slavery are important themes in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. These themes are very important because they help the story referenceto the reader a time in America when freedom and slavery was so important. Freedom and slavery as a theme are the backbone of the story and give the story meaning. Huck expresses feelings toward Jim that many during the same era were also experiencing but afraid to express.
Chapter 19 is a good example of the differences between whites and blacks during the time of Huckleberry Finn. Whites were free men. Even though they still got into trouble they were free to go and leave and make decisions as they choose. Blacks however, were a different story. The blacks were not free and were kept as slaves. This is shown while Huck and Jim are on the raft. Jim uses the color of Huck’s skin to threaten others. this example was a real life example of how slavery was and how people used it. Since slavery was so powerful and such a large means of life, Jim knows that Huck has an advantage because he is white.
As chapters 23- 25 are explored the ignorance of racism begins to be diminished between Huck and Jim. Huck begins to see that Jim is a person just like him. Once he realizes that blacks and whites are the same he can see the true ignorance of racism. This realization is important to the theme since it opens the eyes of Huck which symbolizes much of America. America slowly began to realize that whites and blacks are equal and freedom for the slaves was necessary.
Since Huck is able to accept the fact that Jim and he are similar individuals after Jim has been captured, this plays into the themes of the book. Huck begins on a new adventure. This adventure is to free his friend even though he has been taught different. If slavery was not such a huge theme, Huck may not be as motivated to seek his new found friend and stand for freedom.