The Rise of cash crops in America due to the carribean

4). The role of planting and the increasing demand for cash crops provided the impetus for increased labor requirements in American soil, supplied by slaves in the Caribbean. In return, cash crops traded for salves “where slaves were exchanged for sugar, rum, salt, and other island products. The ships returned home loaded with products popular with the European people, and ready to begin their journey again” (The Caribbean Education Online, 2006, par. 1).
In this regard, the research aims to proffer issues that would examine the influence of the Caribbean on American cash crops. Many people from the Caribbean immigrated to the United States in the 1700s and 1800s and brought with them the popularity of the cash crop business. The discourse would initially delve into cash crops, in general. and cash crops in the United States in the 18th century. With its increasing demand, the route by which these crops were traded, known to be the triangular trade, would likewise be explained. The Caribbean’s role in the trade would also be presented prior to an analysis of the significant aspects or factors that led to the increased demand and production of cash crops in America during the period under study.
As previously defined, cash crops are agricultural crops grown for the purpose of selling or trading them for money. This kind of crops was differentiated from subsistence crops which were defined as crops “fed to the producers own livestock or grown as food for the producers family. In earlier times cash crops were usually only a small (but vital) part of a farms total yield, while today, especially in the developed countries, almost all crops are mainly grown for cash. In non-developed nations, cash crops are usually crops which attract demand in more developed nations, and hence have some export value” (Webster, 2010, par. 3).
During the 18th century, “the colonies of the