The Question of Orientalism the Demonization and Islam

Edward Said was in Canada during the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995, and just after it happened he was called off the hook by journalists simply because being from the Middle East, he may have had an inside insight into the bombing and that he might be able to understand and hence explain what had been done. This shows how people’s ignorance gets out of control in times of crisis.
Orientalism and the Palestinian question
This section talks of co-existence between religions, race, traditions, and beliefs. It shows how to understand one another and therefore expects to understand in order for us to all live peacefully and amicably with each other.
The subsequent pages will focus more on Orientalism today – the demonization and Islam in the news and popular culture and on the Oklahoma City bombing.
From the time the very first bomb emerged from the Middle East, the world of Islam was tainted black with the notion that everyone from there must be a terrorist, an extremist and a suicide bomber. Books against Islam have been written in the hundreds, all showing the negative side of Islam. Walt Disney tried showing the positive side of Islam and the Middle East in his version of Aladdin, the animated movie, but even there, in the opening song, as was transcribed in the Edward Said video transcript says “I come from a land, from a faraway place where a caravan camels roam, where it’s flat and immense and the heat is intense, it’s barbaric, but hey, it’s home…”
Songs have been written portraying Osama Bin Laden dancing foolishly at the end after the lyrics have done nothing but an insult. Movies like My Name is Khan, based on the September 2011 bombings of the twin tower, that try to show how Americans behave towards Muslims that have lived with them as friends, colleagues, are suddenly shunned, insulted and ostracized no matter whether they were not involved in slightest or that they do not even speak any of the Middle Eastern languages.