The Princess Bride

Movie Review The Princess Bride is categorized as a romantic comedy with snippets of fantasy. Directed and produced by Bob Reiner in 1987, the movie was primarily set from a novel by William Goldman in 1973. Based on the novel, the film presents the contextual aspect of the story through a book narration by a grandfather to his son. Consequently, this aspect helps the film retain the designated narrative style that is evident in the novel. Specifically, I chose this movie due to it sequential nature and the cut scenes that play a significant role in the subsequent support of the plot.
As mentioned earlier, the video uses a narration told by a grandfather (Peter Falk) to his sick grandson (Fred Savage). With the keen interest in the cinematography, the narrative occasionally disrupts the delivery of the plot. When the young man falls ill, he is visited by his grandfather. In a bid to cheer the grandson up, the grandfather buys a story book entitled ‘The Princess Bride, a tale of the love between the beautiful Buttercup and the besotted Westley.”
The story is centered mainly on the love broken when Westley is presumed to be dead during a sea voyage while in pursuit of his fortune (Goldman 16). This incident left his girlfriend, Buttercup, in a desolate state which pushed her to voting against love. Later on, Buttercup seems to have forgotten about the demise and the position held by Westley in her life. In this regard, she accepts a marriage proposal from Prince Humperdinck. He is presented as a wealthy and handsome prince who is also the heir to the Florin throne.
The land was defined by fire swamps, intense quicksands, and unusually large rodents. Adding to the adventurous touch, the area is also characterized by exotic swordsmen, vile swamps, pirates, kidnappers, torturous, and giants. These set of environment provides a perfect platform from the adventure surrounding the love between Westley and Buttercup.
Later, Buttercup is kidnaped in order to use her as leverage for war. This instance catalyzed the return of Westley as the Dread Pirate Roberts to save his love of his life. Westley sets up a team that includes a giant, a thief, a swordsman and hired helpers in a bid to save Buttercup from the three Outlaws. After he successfully rescues her, Westley is arrested and tortured by Humperdinck to his death. Meanwhile, Inigo and Fezzik find Westley’s body and take it to Miracle Max who resurrects him. Later, Inigo slays Rugen (his father’s killer), and Westley manages to save Buttercup from suicide.
The main female character in the movie is Buttercup. She is loves farming and is also the princess of Forin. Initially, she is seen as bossy and scornful. Clearly, this is evident as she ordered Westley around when he was her farm boy. She later falls in love, to her surprise, with Westley and sees a happy ending in their love life. However, this does not come easy. their relationship suffers various setbacks with her abduction and the killing of Westly at the hands of Humperdinck.
Subsequently, the movie can be told from Buttercup’s point of view. Here, the cruelty of Humperdinck will be highlighted in detail with regards to how he treated Buttercup. Additionally, Buttercup’s point of view will show the ruthlessness of her kidnappers that was orchestrated the cruel Humperdinck. Lastly, this view will also add a dynamic nature to the plot that would probably add to the original novel by William Goldman.
In conclusion, the movie is well set with a good narration aspect that helps in the successful delivery of the plot in line with the effective choice of the cast.

Works Cited
Goldman, William.&nbsp.The Princess Bride: S. Morgensterns Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure : the "good Parts" Version Abridged. New York: Ballantine Pub. Group, 1998. Print.