The Power of States

The state can also be described as a political institution with a core government that maintains command of the rightful use of coercion to achieve loyalty within a definite territory.
States worldwide have increasingly misused (exaggerated) their power, and this sometimes led to violent protests or revolutions, as witnessed recently in the Arab countries. Dictatorial leadership styles where leaders want to stay in power more than they are required are to be blamed for this. The protests have resulted in countless deaths of innocent citizens and atrocities against humans committed by state machineries such as the army and police. States behave like this because there is no power that holds them accountable.
This paper will illustrate how the state operates, the role of the state and its obligations to its citizens, the various instruments that the state uses to obtain allegiance, the role of the media in shaping the image of the state and its representation of situations such as war, and, lastly, the rise of resistance and rebellion against the state. A nation is a term used to refer to people who belong to a shared cultural community with a historical trajectory (Heywood, 2011).
Every state, whether capitalist or democratic, uses various forms of coercion. Even under pluralism, where a lot of official democratic liberty exists, the state uses tyranny, sometimes in enormous quantities. A case in point is the penal structure in the United States of America. Approximately two million prisoners, or 60 percent, are black, and this shows that the legal system has been utilized as a tool of repression against the black community.
In every society, there is likely to be a set of regulations which are largely acknowledged by society. These forbid anti-social actions such as murder, rape, and theft. Through such laws and their enforcement, a country attains its class as an impartial watchdog of the society.&nbsp.