Texting While Driving A Life at Risk Behind the Wheels

Setting aside the social and work-related aspects, the incessant use of mobile phones regardless of the situation has already been putting lives at risk – especially, if it is done behind the wheels. Using mobile phones, or at the very least, texting while driving is outright dangerous and should be stopped. There is a number of studies and policies done on this matter which proves that this is more than just a bias observation but is something based on facts.

To argue the existence of the problem requires establishing the cause. In this case, the cause of the problem is the relentless use of mobile phones while driving. In a research conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2011, it was reported that 31.2% of drivers in the United States aged 18-64 years admitted to texting or accessing email while driving (Naumann 179). Though at a lower percentage than in the United States, the incidence of such behavior among seven European countries surveyed ranged from 15.1% to 31.3% (Naumann 179) – figures which are difficult to ignore. This means that this problem is not unique to the United States alone but is probably being faced by many other countries wherein researches have yet to be conducted.

In a separate report by the U.S. Department of Transportation, it was found that the percentage of drivers who text or manipulate mobile devices even increased from 1.3 percent in 2011 to 1.5 percent in 2012 (Pickrell 1). Further comparisons included the years prior – as early as 2004 – and surprisingly, an increasing trend in the use of electronic devices was evident. It is important to reiterate that these statistics pertains to texting alone and do not yet even cover other mobile phone related activities done while driving such as making a call, surfing the internet, listening to music, etc.

Nevertheless, the figures go to show that a lot of people have not realized the danger of texting while driving.