Special Issues in Childhood and Adolescent Sexual Development

Special issues in childhood and adolescent sexual development Childhood and adolescent sexual behaviors seem very complex and unimaginable at some extents if one fails to conduct extensive research about human sexuality.&nbsp.
Understanding the trend of masturbation and orgasm in children and adolescent, and puberty in adolescents is important to counselors as they are able to understand certain sexual anomalies that may appear in children and adolescents as they grow. Depending on the response of the immediate society to a masturbating child, adolescents or adults may exhibit sexual passiveness or activeness. If parents of a masturbating child punished, scolded or warned the given child against masturbating, the child may grow knowing that the practice is bad and may end up not exploiting their sexual abilities. This may lead to sexually inactive adolescents with retarded sexual interest or desire. Having such knowledge may help a counselor track the beginning of particular sexual abnormalities.
Rathus, Nevid and Fitchner-Rathus (2014) report that human begins begin to experience orgasm as early as during infancy to childhood, adolescence and to adulthood. Having this background knowledge is important to help a counselor dealing with clients experiencing abnormal orgasmic response trace, identify possible historical causes, and find appropriate solutions. Understanding puberty and related processes as happens among adolescents is a special issue that a counselor needs to know about human sexual development. As mentioned by Rathus, Nevid and Fitchner-Rathus (2014), puberty defines the basic onset of adolescence. Adolescence prepares individuals for adulthood encounters. Puberty and adolescence usually trigger impulsive sexual feelings that may lead to inappropriate sexual behaviors. Counselors need to understand the process of puberty during adolescence to be able to help troubled adolescents face and overcome problems and embarrassments that usually characterize the stage.