Speaking in Tongues in Todays Church

The word baptize comes from the root word bapto- it means to dip, to dip in, or to immerse. This should not be confused with baptizo which is our word. The clearest example that shows the meaning of baptism is a text from the Greek poet and physician Nicander, who lived about 200 B. C. It is a recipe for making pickles and is helpful because it uses both words. Nicander says that in order to make a pickle, the vegetable should first be `dipped (bapto) into boiling water and then `baptized (baptizo) in the vinegar solution. Both verbs concern the immersing of vegetables in a solution. But the first is temporary. The second, the act of baptizing the vegetable, produces a permanent change and also suggests the evidence is specific in nature and very noticeable by all.2

From this, it is clear to see the difference between Who brings us to salvation and what happens at the moment believers are baptized in the Spirit. Looking at another aspect of the Spirit as he relates to the believer’s abilities, 1 Corinthians 12:3 makes reference to a specific work of the Holy Ghost (as it is in the text):

Looking into this scripture it becomes evident that the Spirit draws us to salvation. Since no man can say that Jesus is the Lord but by the Spirit (Holy Ghost) it stands to reason that one of the roles that He plays is bringing us to salvation. However, this is not to be confused with the baptism in the Holy Spirit. Acts 19:3-6 brings the reader to an account of some believers who have yet to experience the baptism in the Spirit with the explicit evidence of speaking in tongues. Paul asks the men about their salvation experience to this point in their lives.

And he said unto them, Unto what, then, were ye baptized? And they said, Unto John’s baptism. Then said Paul, John verily baptized with the baptism of repentance, saying unto the people, that they should believe on him that should come after him, that is, on Christ Jesus.&nbsp.