Social Interactions in Burma

These people were only a minority, though. They started by putting up posters and shouting about the apparent abuse of the military government. The people protested on the oil price hike. They also clamored for a continuous supply of electricity in the country. However, a few hours after the commencement of the protests, the activists were sent to jail. However short-lived their protests were, they were able to ignite the minds of other Burmese people (Heart, 2007).
The Burmese government has been run by its military forces since 1962. The country was then led by a military man named Ne-Win. The said military official enforced a Burmese version of Socialism. The government took control of major industries in the country. He argued that it was the best way to establish economic stability for the country. The government policy worked on the concept of self-sufficiency. Soon, almost all the key positions in the local industry were occupied by military men. However, after just a few months the Burmese people found their economy falling even further. It was evident that their military men were not doing god in their new-found jobs. By 1988, Burmese people could no longer tolerate the state of their economy vis-à-vis the increasing corruption brought about by monopolies and red tape in the government. The Burmese people staged protest actions in the hope of producing a change in the government during those times. They were not successful, however. Shortly after the period of instability, the Burmese government which as still led by military men started to invite foreign investors to their country. After the era of being almost self-sufficient, the Burmese government decided to approach economic and political matters from the other side of the fence. However, military men still held key positions in the government.