Social Change Within Developmental Psychology

Running Head: SOCIAL CHANGE WITHIN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Pre School Age During the ages of 3 to 6, toddlers start undergoing the preoperational stage of Piaget cognitive development theory (Allen, 2009). This stage is also known as the preschool stage where the children start using their imagery and memory skills. Although the children would have learnt about how to interact with most of their peers they begin testing their developmental limits by learning negative things such as lying, being abusing the adults or bullying. At this stage, they also develop increased attention span, begin to learn how to read and write among other structured routines such as household chores. The social change that can be achieved at this state of development is teaching the children respect and hard work. A society that has member with innate respect and zest for work is likely to live in harmony and develop at a faster rate.
To positively bring about social change among preschoolers, there are a number of things that can be put in place. One of them is the use of positive reinforcement. Positive reinforcement involves complementing the child when they show positive behaviors such as saying thank you or greeting an adult. This was the child would be encouraged to do more of the positive behavior to get remarks (Piaget, 2001).
Another way, I would employ is the use of proper modeling. Parents and guardians have immense impact and influence on their toddler’s behavior. For example if a child has never seen the parent yell or shout at someone, they are likely to do that .I believe that when children acquire good behavior at the tender ager, they will likely grow p into responsible ,respective and diligent adolescence and later adults. Responsible parenting yields to a responsible generation and society.
References
Allen, R. (2009) How Behavior Changes in Toddlers: Ages 18moths to 2.5 years. New Jersey: Penguin Punlishers.
Feigenson, L., Dehaene, S., Spelke, E. (2004). Core Systems of Number. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 8. 307-314.
Piaget, J. (2001). Studies in Reflecting Abstraction. Hove, UK: Psychology Press.