SOC Final Essay

Examination #2 is a 5-page Essay Examination based on our course materials used in the Sociology of Sexuality in the second half of our course; it will require the use of at least 4 course readings.The attached handout includes detailed information about this examination and its requirements;The 5-6 page essay is due by 11:59pm MST on Saturday, May 16, 2020.Choose ONE of the following two essay options:1. The last topic that we examined in our semester together was sex work, which as you know is certainly a controversial subject. Take a moment to consider your own perspective on the topic, particularly in terms of the legal status of prostitution. Begin the essay by identifying and explaining two forms of evidence that support your own perspective at the legal/social/moral status of sex work, then identify and explain two forms of evidence that support a stance that differs from your own. Conclude by reflecting upon what members of society, regardless of their individual views on prostitution, can do to support the human dignity of individuals in this field. Be sure to use FOUR course readings in your essay.2. This essay option asks you to place yourself in a scenario and consider how you would concretely respond to it. Imagine that you have a cousin who is 16 and gay. They have recently come out to their parents (your aunt and uncle), who are very upset by this news and have offered to pay for your cousin to go through conversion/reparative therapy. Your cousin is not interested in this, but is considering it to appease their parents. However, your cousin loves and trusts you, and knowing that you have taken a course on Sociology of Sexuality this term, has asked you to email their parents about what conversion/reparative therapy actually entails, its legal status in the United States, and how it impacts those who have experienced it. Be sure to use FOUR course readings in your“email,” and feel free to be creative by making up names for all parties involved, biographical details, and any other personalizing information to contextualize your message to your aunt and uncle.Available ResourcesFor this assignment, students are required to reference 4 separate course readings in the text of their essays. Videos watched for class may be used as additional sources, but will NOT replace course readings for the four required references. Note that since our readings are all from a single edited volume, be sure to cite the author of each reading individually, rather than the volume editors.Course Readings1. Rye and Meaney, “The Pursuit of Sexual Pleasure,” pp. 345-356 [SEX]2. Fahs, “Getting, Giving, Faking, Having: Orgasm and the Performance of Pleasure,” pp. 358-374[SEX]3. Siebers, “A Sexual Culture for Disabled People,” pp. 375-384 [SEX]4. Sheff and Hammers, “The Privilege of Perversities: Race, Class and Education AmongPolyamorists and Kinksters,” pp. 387-402 [SEX]5. Carrington, “There’s More to Life than Sex? Difference and Commonality within the AsexualCommunity,” pp. 403-412 [SEX]6. Nash and Bain, “‘Reclaiming Raunch”? Spatializing Queer Identities at Toronto Women’s Bathhouse Events,” pp. 415-421 [SEX]7. Steinbugler, “Visibility as Privilege and Danger: Heterosexual and Same-Sex InterracialIntimacy,” pp. 422-431 [SEX]8. Weis, “Becoming a Practitioner: The Biopolitics of BDSM,” pp. 432-440 [SEX]9. Sterling and Simonds, “HPV Vaccines: Kids and Controversy,” pp. 470-474 [SEX]10. Mullis and Baunach, “The Social Control of Adult-Child Sex,” pp. 495-508 [SEX]11. Windsor, “Sick Sex,” pp. 513-520 [SEX]12. Lepore, “Birthright: A History of Planned Parenthood,” pp. 521-527 [SEX]13. Phillips, “Deconstructing “Down Low” Discourse: The Politics of Sexuality, Gender, Race,AIDS, and Anxiety,” pp. 535-541 [SEX]14. Kimmel, “Hooking Up: Sex in Guyland,” pp. 545-553 [SEX]15. Acosta, “How Could You Do This To Me?”: How Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer LatinasNegotiate Sexual Identity with Their Families,” pp. 569-576 [SEX]16. Gavey, “I Wasn’t Raped, but . . .” Revisiting Definitional Problems in Sexual Victimization,” pp.583-593 [SEX]17. Edwards, Turchic, Dardis, Reynolds, and Gidycz, “Rape Myths,” pp. 597-607 [SEX]18. Fowles, “The Fantasy of Acceptable “Non-Consent,” pp. 608-611 [SEX]19. Armstrong, Hamilton, and Sweeney, “Sexual Assault on Campus: A Multilevel, IntegrativeApproach to Party Rape,” pp. 612-626 [SEX]20. Walker, Archer, and Davies, “Effects of Rape on Men: A Descriptive Analysis,” pp. 628-639[SEX]21. Nagel, “Rape and War: Fighting Men and Comfort Women,” pp. 641-648 [SEX]22. Bernstein, “Sex Work for the Middle Classes,” pp. 652-658 [SEX]23. Shapkina, “Not for Sale: Stopping Sex Trafficking in the United States and Worldwide,” pp.673-680 [SEX]24. Brents and Hausbeck, “Marketing Sex: U.S. Legal Brothels and Late Capitalist Consumption,”pp. 681-689 [SEX]25. Kelly, “Legalized Prostitution,” pp. 689-690 [SEX]26. Windsor and Burges, “Sex Matters: Future Visions for a Sex-Positive Society,” pp. 691-699[SEX]Videos1.“Modern Love: Polyamorous Family” (22 minutes)2“American Experience: Stonewall Uprising” (84 minutes)3.“The Long Night” (70 minutes)Nuts and Bolts1.References: 4 course readings2. In-text citations and References section in APA format3. 12-point font, Times New Roman4. 1” margins throughout5. Minimum total length = 5 pages (i.e. at least 4.5 pages, with the 5th page being at least to thehalf-way point of the page); Maximum total length = 6 full pages6. Page numbers on ALL pagesPAPER GRADENuts and Bolts Requirements (worth 5 points)References Page in APA Format IncludedMinimum Length Requirements Met (5 pages)Font, Margin and Spacing Requirements MetPage Numbers IncludedSubstantive RequirementsCogent and Thorough Substantiation of ClaimsAddresses all Components of Chosen Essay PromptMeaningful use of FOUR Course ReadingsGood Writing Style, Spelling, and Grammar16/05/202020socialscience