Satanism and Adolescents The Attraction to Satanic Symbols and Rituals

As one approaches a study of adolescent behavior in the acceptance of satanic concepts as a cultural identity, the identification of Satanism is a varied concept. While the Christian definitions of Satanism are sometimes based on distorted information and superstitions, a disturbing undercurrent of satanic influences has invaded mainstream pop culture and created an apathetic view of dark ideas. As adolescents seek to define their individuality, the media images that are representative of a darker culture can create an identity that allows a teen to express a firm difference from parental influence. However, to divert the responsibility of society in creating contributing members to the influence of satanic forces is a disservice to society. The infusion of Satanism in mainstream society has created an increase in gang identification with Satan and apathy of attitude towards violence.

The term ‘Satanism’ evokes a host of images brought into our culture by means of a sensationalistic press, film fictions, and mythological fear. The history of Satanism is confused with pagan religions and intertwined with other non-Christian religious identities that create a history of prejudice and false fears. It is very easy to invite people to either embrace or fearfully reject concepts based on inflammatory information. Those who choose a mainstream life will easily develop a fear of anything that appears to threaten that lifestyle, while those who are unsatisfied might embrace an idea that fulfills a sense of non-conformity when their life is not fulfilled in the mainstream. These ideas come into conflict as mythology and history collide to form the social identities of individuals as they move through society. Images associated with ‘Satanism’ in modern times were not always associated with the evil that surrounds the mythology of Satan. The pentagram, for example, was used in early history for more mundane meanings. The first known usage was “found around 3500 BC at Ur of the Chaldees in Ancient Mesopotamia.&nbsp.