Role of Television in Stereotyping

One of the key reasons why television bears the blame is that women’s role and portrayal on television has remained constant although a few insignificant changes have been made. The reason for this is that one, the woman is depicted as an overly feminine object only capable of executing “female” roles in films, advertisements, and programs. For instance, men still play hero roles in most films, mostly protecting, saving, or tormenting women. Additionally, advertisements portray women as attractive objects used to market things by use of their sexual appeal.
The final evidence regarding the preservation of cultural stereotyping is racial segregation in films. There is still white domination in most films, with the people of colour playing mostly secondary roles, or being portrayed as inferior, unintelligent, criminals, or slaves. In short, an above average of television broadcasts places the white man above the black, or the black playing secondary to the white. One of the key examples is the film The Gods Must Be Crazy which portrayed a black man as being overly primitive.
The 21st century has brought with it digitalization which has in turn given birth to digital networks and communities. Unlike in real-life communities where contact, communication, conflicts and all other aspects of life are done face to face, the same is virtually executed on these digital communities. This, therefore, presents a twofold scenario when it comes to socializing. it can either foster or degrade it. Again, there is a danger in that owing to its virtual nature, digital networking is easy to manipulate thus give rise to virtual creations which may not exist in reality. What this means is that digital communities allow people to “write” themselves, meaning they can create multiple personalities of who they are not.