Racial Oppression in Sonnys Blues Dream Deferred and Crash

During the course of our short history on earth, humans have sanctioned the death of millions of innocent individuals on account of innate psychological differences. Hitler is the most obvious, his construction of Nazi Germany and the Aryan race was grounded in the philosophical teachings of Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche. Nietzsche taught that if social progression is valuable, then society has to cut the weakest members out of society because the strong are forced to carry an undue workload. With the weakest members gone society will be able to progress to its fullest. Hence Hitler thought that the Jewish community was a “Weak Race” that corrupted all the good in German culture. Such a corrupt narrative led to the death of millions of innocent lives. Arguments concerning Genetic inferiority still exist today, The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray depicts American Blacks to be somewhat genetically predisposed to have lower average IQ’s but with little progression from the more extreme philosophy of Nietzsche, certain writers acknowledge some environmental causes for the low IQ average which tells us that nature isn’t everything, the environment matters as well.&nbsp.
To summarize the main concepts of Critical race theory, there are three main characteristics. First, that racism is ordinary, not aberrational (“normal science”), the usual way society functions, the frequent, everyday experience of most people of color (Crenshaw et al.). Second, most would concur that our system of white-over-color ascendancy serves important purposes, both&nbsp.psychological and material. The first feature, ordinariness, means that racism is difficult to cure or redress. Color-blind, or “formal”, conceptions of equality, expressed in rules that insist only on treatment that is the same across the board can thus remedy only the most blatant forms of discrimination such as mortgage redlining or the refusal to hire a black Ph.D. rather than a white high school dropout (Crenshaw et al.).