Principles of Community Care Provision Reflecting on the Roles of Carers

The definition also looks at the different aspects of the health of human beings that should be addressed quickly when one aspect is not working well.
An example that can be presented in the description above is if an older person who has osteoarthritis lives alone, she cannot be considered a healthy person. She needs care from the community where she lives. On the other hand, age is also considered a determinant of health. Old age is associated with slow and gradual deterioration in a person’s health, disability, and consequently, the need for health and social care.

Older persons need social and health care more than any other. It is logical and proper that the government and society focus their resources – time, effort, talent, and finances – for the provision of health care for older people. (Basford, 2003, p. 42)
There has been a tremendous increase in clients (older persons), estimated at 1.72 million, receiving services in the UK. These patients or service users have been supported by the CSSR (Councils with Social Services Responsibilities) during the period 2004 to 2005. From this number, about 1.47 million clients (85%) were provided community-based services, while the rest were served in their residences after they were assessed by the NHS. These figures provide a picture of the need for care services, both from formal and informal carers. (Health Knowledge, 2011)

During the period after World War II, the NHS underwent three broad periods wherein each period was characterized by a particular philosophy that underpinned social policy. The first period was the beginning of the creation of the welfare state wherein older citizens were provided the basic needs in life, such as want, treatment from disease, education, work, and squalor. The state’s response was to provide these basic necessities from birth up to adulthood and death (‘cradle to grave’). This principle is known as Keynesian economics – the State manages the economy in order to attain economic growth and generate jobs. (Edgar, 2010, p. 44)