Piracy in Somalia

Lawlessness has been a feature of the Somali condition since the early days of the Civil War which ravaged the country, making it one of the poorest places on earth. Accordingly, rampant lawlessness is directly related to both the implosion of Somalia’s domestic security as well as the piracy problem off the coast of Somalia. Piracy in Somalia is an important policy problem with international ramifications and from a strategic management position, worth extensive analysis.
What can the international community do to solve the piracy problems off of the Somali coast? Is there a role for international actors in solving this problem? If so, who should act? Do regional actors have a role in providing maritime security along the Gulf of Aden, and if so, do they have the means to safeguard the shipment of goods through this region? What roles can NATO and the European Union play in ensuring security along these troubled shores? Should the world’s military hegemon, the United States, act to ensure that international law is followed off the coast of Somalia? These questions, and many more, will be addressed with reference to the problems associated with piracy in Somalia.
The African continent, although the cradle of humanity and endowed with vast natural resources, is home to some of the poorest countries on the planet. Accordingly, Africa is characterized by a growing population and a basic lack of resources to sustain this high-level growth. Seeking to explore poverty and malnutrition in Sub Saharan Africa through an analysis of the political and economic situation in Somalia, one of Africa’s poorest countries, the following will show the linkages between poverty and political instability. In the context of Somalia, it is apparent that political instability perpetuates economic stagnation and any attempts at resolving the poverty crisis in the region.