PARLIAMENT POLITICS AND POLICY MAKING CHALLENGES TO WESTMINSTER DEVOLUTION AND THE EUROPEAN UNION

It is defined by an enhanced entanglement between local, national and international frameworks of authority. This change in a way also means that Westminster is losing power both upwards to the European Union and downwards to the devolved institutions. Westminster Model The traditional Westminster model envisaged a representative and not participative form of governance. In this system of governance, the party majority accrued an exaggerated importance and relevance. The government not only directly controlled the party, but the ministers in the government also exercised control and directive powers over the civil servants that should ideally have been neutral (Rhodes et al 2009). These ministers in turn were directly under the influence and control of the PM. Simply, put, the provisions enshrined in the Westminster model supported a system of governance, in which the overall power and discretion was vested into the hands of a few key individuals or core executives (Rhodes et al 2009). …
However, it goes without saying that the Westminster model had its inbuilt deficiencies and flaws. The primary weakness of this system was that it was not directly in consonance with the aspirations of the British masses and hence was rejected in favour of alternate systems like multi-level governance. Going by the fact that the scope of the state is always extensive and vast, a centralized system of government is always open to the possibility of getting overloaded, thereby leading to inefficiency and ineffectiveness (Rhodes et al 2009). The Westminster model simply allowed the ministers to focus on a few issues of governance, leading to ignorance and sidelining of the many other (Rhodes et al 2009). Even if the Westminster model led to the designing of influential policies, there always lays a great difference between coming out with great policy drafts and assuring that they get effectively implemented at the grass root level. Multi-Level Governance Multi-level governance is a direct response to the deficiencies embedded in the Westminster model. It aims at a decentralization of the framing and implementation of the policy decisions. Multi-level governance as the name suggest is multi-level and not hierarchical. It is a fragmented and not centralized system of governance with many centres (Bache &amp. Flinders 2004). Multi-level governance, unlike the Westminster model assures that the policies get framed and implemented through negotiation, consensus and steering and not through control and compulsion (Bache &amp. Flinders 2004). This system envisages a quasi-federal and not a unitary state defined by a segmented control and administration and not an all powerful and strong