Newspaper Articles Summary

Newspaper Articles Summary Newspaper Articles Summary Summary of the article New York Times article “Why our Children don’t think there are Moral Facts”, by Justin Mcbrayer.
Mcbrayer begins his article by saying that in the contemporary world, many college students do not believe in moral facts, but they view moral values as mere opinions that are not true or are true relative to a culture. Mcbrayer refutes the claim that the main reason why many college students do not believe in moral facts is because of the philosophers who advocate for moral relativism. Mcbrayer argues in the article that the attitude of viewing moral claims as mere opinions among college students cannot have originated from the philosophers because young people have the attitude of viewing moral values as opinions even before they enrol in colleges. For that reason, Mcbrayer says that root cause of this attitude must lie somewhere else but not in the philosphers.
Mcbrayer argues in the article that the attitude of viewing moral values as mere opinions that are not factual lies in the education system of America, particularly in the curriculum. Mcbrayer says that his research on the topic made him to realize that children are taught, from very tender age, to view moral values as being mere beliefs or opinions. Mcbrayer goes on to argue that children are taught that a fact is a claim that can be evidenced, on the other hand, an opinion is a claim that cannot be evidenced or proved. For this reason, Mcbrayer argues, children are taught to view all moral claims as being mere claims and not facts. For his reason, according to Mcbrayer, children develop negative attitude against moral values and the view moral values as being untrue claims. Mcbrayer claims in the article that the dichotomy of facts and opinions in the curriculum in American schools accounts for the reason why American children think that there are no moral facts. Mcbrayer concludes his article by saying that moral values are indeed facts and not mere opinions. for Mcbrayer, a belief or an opinion can be true. For this reason, moral values are indeed true claims and for that reason they are facts and not mere opinions.
A critical view of Mcbrayer’s views in this article shows that Mcbrayer is right in his view that moral values are facts and not mere opinions. This is because, although, we cannot give proof or evidence of moral values, there are many other things in life that we cannot give evidence of and yet we hold them as truth. Since moral values help human beings to live well and to maintain human dignity, moral values are indeed facts and not mere opinions.
Summary of the New York Times article, “My Own Life”, by Olive Sacks
In this article, an Oliver sack laments the fact that she is suffering from the cancer of the Oliver. Despite the fact that Oliver’s life is coming to an end soon because of the cancer, Oliver, is quite grateful to God for the fact that he has lived quite a long time, Oliver was 72 when he was diagnosed with the cancer of the liver, and he lived up to age 81. Oliver was quite grateful that, despite being diagnosed with cancer at age 72, he managed to live a healthy life of productivity before his condition deteriorated.
In this article, Oliver says that he chose to live fully the few remaining months of his life, rather than get distressed about the inevitable approaching death. In supporting his view that it is better to live a happy and productive life for the few remaining moths in his life rather than sink into desperation and frustration, Oliver quotes his favourite Philospher Sir David Hume. On learning that he was about to die at age 65, David Hume wrote his autobiography in a single day entitled “My Own Life”. In the autobiography, Hume expressed his gratitude for life and he also expressed his desire to live happily and productively for the few remaining time in his life. Oliver says in the article that, he has in fact been luckier than Hume because he has been able to live 15 years more than Hume. Oliver concludes his article by expression his optimistic attitude of life and his desire to live happily and productively in the few remaining months of his life.
A critical view of Oliver’s Sacks article shows that Oliver Sacks was a man who valued human dignity. This is because, despite the fact that he was about to die, Oliver expressed his determination and his optimism to live happily and productively. This fact shows that Oliver Sacks was a man who valued living with dignity.

References
Mcbrayer, J.P. “Why Our Children Don’t Think There Are Moral Facts”. New York Times.
2nd March, 2025.
Sacks, O. “My Own Life”. New York Times. 19th Feb., 2015.