Multiple Sclerosis can be Managed and Treated

MS is a chronic neurologic disease that comments on Experience Project indicates commonly affects the young adults aged between 25 and 35, targeting the central nervous system, CNS encompassing the optic nerve, spinal cord and the brain (Gelfand, Gelfand and Goadsby 73). It has been considered as an autoimmune disease which causes severe neurological disability due to demyelination, thus the reason for my numbness and fatigue. According to Amor and Noort (1), the massive amount of white blood cells that go into the tissue would cause swellings and consequently damage the tissue around the nerve fibers. Since these nerve fibers play a critical role in transmitting signals around the body, the damage could affect the functioning of the whole body. The female to male ratio of distribution has been documented as 3:1 (World Health Organization 17). One out of one thousand people suffer from MS in the Western world and the proportion keeps growing. In Europe, the disease affects about 400,000 people with the global figure standing at 2.5 million people according to Scolding and Wilkins (1), costing the EU economy approximately €9 billion every year.
This disorder has been greatly associated with genetic factors, an argument that Scolding and Wilkins (4) use to explain the difference in its spread among different populations, notably the low prevalence among the Chinese and the Asian communities compared to the high prevalence in North America, the UK, Germany, and Norway. Additionally, WHO (15) argues on the higher prevalence of the disorder in families that have a member who has been a victim, than in the general population. But to the best of my knowledge, no one in the family had suffered this disorder. As such, other factors could have played a greater role in causing the disorder.