Memory Training in Older Adults

As memory loss in ageing is related to deficit in declarative memory, emphasis should be given to effective techniques that will help retain more information. Based on the cognitive theory of memory, theorists have suggested various methods of teaching to improve the recollection of information. This may include visual representation of information, repetition of the particular information, the technique of acting out the particular information, known as “learning by doing” or by using short forms.
The research conducted by George W et al concluded that certain cognitive abilities could have lasting effects in the elderly. The study was conducted for a period of 10 years, at the end of the study they concluded that the reasoning and thinking skills could be retained in the elderly, but there was no particular difference in the memory performance among the control group and the memory-training group. The study was a randomized controlled trial with 2,832 persons with an average of 74 years of age during the beginning of study. They had a formal education of up to 14 years of age. The samples were divided into three training groups (speed processing, memory, and reasoning) and a control group that did not receive any training. The training was conducted for 60 to 70 minutes for a period of 5 to 6 weeks and some of the participants were randomly selected for additional sessions. The training was evaluated soon after the session and in the first, second, third, fourth and fifth year as well as 10 years later.