Managing for Results

The officer in command was Captain William Bligh and Fletcher Christian was second in command. Some countrymen are pressed into serving the English navy for this voyage of about 2 years. After having faced various hardships put forth by the sea and the Captain in command, alike, they reached Tahiti and obtained the breadfruit plants during their six month stay on the island. However, shortly after leaving Tahiti, Christian leads a mutiny against Captain Bligh in revolt of his atrocities on the seamen. They manage to capture and cast Bligh and his loyalists in a life boat with some supplies while Christian and his loyalists return to Tahiti in the HMS Bounty. Bligh and his people make the most remarkable conduct of navigation in the history of the sea – a 3500 mile open sea voyage aboard a life boat. Bligh reaches Timor Island. He returns to Tahiti aboard another ship in search of the mutineers, lead by Fletcher Christian. Christian and a few men escape in the Bounty while several others remain on the island. They are taken to England by Bligh and are tried for mutiny. Most men are executed for their crime except Roger Byam. Christen and his followers reach Pitcairn Island, where they decide to spend the rest of their lives, and burn down the Bounty so as to not be found by English searchers.
‘A story of a man who robbed his seamen, cursed them, flogged them not to punish, but to break their spirit. A story of greed and tyranny…..and of anger against it, of what it cost’ – Roger Byam during the trial (Mutiny on the Bounty, 1935)
Captain William Blighs managerial abilities on the Bounty is an excellent example of how one man changed from control leadership to team unity with a change in the situation, over 2 centuries years ago.
Bligh tries to enforce harsh ‘discipline’ by various means – flogging a dead seaman for striking his captain, shortening rations as per the Captains prerogative, public chastisement of Christian, Bligh accusing