Main Features of Cohesion on Politics

Taking an excerpt from the speech, “I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at a table of brotherhood”. The connection is evident that sons, in either case, are son which is the bottom line.
According to Goddard, (1998), and Hutcheon, (2000), stylistically the speech is a political treatise, or a work of poetry delivered masterfully like an improvised sermon. Former slave owners and former slaves are both able to bear sons and become like brothers. This connection is that former slave owners and former slaves are supposed to be like brothers. But Martin Luther King could see this in a dream that would come true (Morris, &amp., Hirst, 1991. Halliday, 1985).
The bursting biblical language and imagery used especially in the first parts of the speech portray a picture of the seething American nightmare of racial segregation against the blacks. The former slave owners are the whites and the former slaves are the blacks. His use of the phrase, “now is the time”. For example, now is the time to open the doors of opportunity to all God’s children. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksand’s of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. This reflects the need for urgency in realizing the dream. It calls for action, and it is the kind of urgency seen in America today, of it has to happen now. This implies that now is the task that is given the first priority (McCarthy, 1991).
A greater part of King’s approach was more visionary and eloquence to the nonviolent movement against black segregation in America. The second part of the speech deals with the dream in a fairer future of racial harmony and integration (Halliday, 1978. Todorova, 1999). The part of the speech that says. I say to you today, my friends, that inspire of the difficulties&nbsp.and frustrations of the moment I still have a dream.&nbsp.