Leo Straus Carl Schmitt

It also includes the state of indifference towards others’ political, social, economic, cultural, personal and religious activities. International politics, international law, state organizations, social justice, equality, liberty and social movements also come into the fold of liberalism. It is Marxism and modernism that have brought the term liberalism in its wake in modern theory and practice giving birth to feminism and other movements subsequently. An over-whelming majority of the scholars and thinkers have welcomed the notion declaring it a necessary element to secure the freedom of the individuals on the one hand, and create a free and fair world on the other.
On the contrary, renowned political philosopher of twentieth century Leo Strauss seriously refutes the idea of liberalism declaring it a constant threat to the feelings of collectivism, national integrity, coherence and social solidarity. He is of the view that contemporary liberalism is the logical outcome of the philosophical principles of modernity, taken to their extremes. (Locke, 2002) Strauss emphatically opines that unchecked liberalism may lead towards conflict, devastation, destruction, turmoil and turbulence. The wars and battles, according to him, are also the outcome of so much and unwanted liberalism that lead the world under the clutches of dictatorship. Carl Schmitt also maintains the same views in this regards. Liberalism, according to him, by its nature, is hostile to all political projects. “In liberal democracy, writes Schmitt, “politics far from being the concern of an elite, has become the despised business of a rather dubious class of persons.” (1985: 4: quoted in Sunic and retrieved in.rosenoire.org/articles/schmitt.php) Thus, he emphatically rejects undue liberalism and declares it the way that paves the way for dictatorship in the world at large.
Meier shows how Schmitt tried to accommodate some of the Strauss textual