Landscapes in Shakespeares The Tempest and Jonsons Bartholomew Fair and To Penshurst

The space of the action is significant as it hints at the imperialist policy of the British. Whereas Jonson’s Bartholomew Fair portrays the religious contention between the Puritans, Anglicans and the Catholics (Pinciss). To this extent not only does Jonson makes the Fair a point of a criss-cross of the several aspects of the ideological conflict but also associates the landscape and the location to historical pieces of evidence. Jonson’s ‘To Penhurst’ is a tribute to the home-ground of Sir Philip Sidney. The poetic tribute refers to the whole genre of the Cavalier Country House poetry that marks an important episode of seventeenth-century poetic practices (Pohl).
There is a paradigmatic shift in The Tempest in terms of the socio-cultural identity of the characters (Sokol, p. 78). The play begins with the common sixteenth-century themes of power contention, hatred and jealousy. The theme of wrongdoing, revenge and retribution runs throughout the play but it is the locale of the unfolding of the drama that gives a glimpse of the socio-historical reality of the Elizabethan age. It is interesting to see that in the course of the play how Prospero changes from an inherently good-natured learned intellectual to a calculative strategist and master of culturally diverse land. The territorial landscape of the island has the features of the Caribbean islands. But it is the story of Prospero’s ousting of Sycorax, freeing of the invisible spirits, enslaving Caliban son of Sycorax that speaks of another version of reality than that meant by the poet. It seems as though that Prospero had only changed the mode of control by eliminating the local power and establishing his own on the natives who significantly remain invisible throughout the play.