Insanity in Edgar Allen Poe’s Works

Focusing on the insanity of the central characters in the above-mentioned four works of Edgar Allen Poe, the discussion will delve further regarding how they all became insane and how their madness reached high extremes thereby leading to dangerous repercussions.

The “Cask of Amontillado” is about the protagonist Montresor’s retelling of how he heinously murdered his friend named Fortunato around fifty years ago. Montresor first lures into his family vaults, gives him wine to make him unbalanced, and then puts bricks all over him as a sort of immurement. He indulges in such a monstrous crime mainly as a mindless vengeance, as he felt that Fortunato has insulted him many times. After committing such a bizarre and insane act, Montresor fails to exhibit any remorse thereby implying that his mind is unstable and becoming insane. At the outset, he shows some signs that he was actually confessing to his gruesome killing, however, he changes track immediately. This perspective can be understood from the sentence, “My heart grew sick — on account of the dampness of the catacombs” (Poe “Cask of Amontillado”). That is, after Montresor states the first part of the sentence, “My heart grew sick” one might get the feeling that he could be remorseful for his actions. However, when one focuses on the&nbsp.second or last part of the sentence, “on account of the dampness of the catacombs”, it is clearly evident he does not have any repentance for his crime and is mainly speaking in an unstable manner because of his unstable mind. Poe has also incorporated the number of scenes to imply that Montresor is an insane individual who does not show any traces of humanity. For example, while immuring Fortunato in his family vaults, Montresor starts to hear Fortunato’s distressing voice and senses his struggles to break open the covering wall.&nbsp.