Inclusion in Early Childhood Education

Programs, lobbies, and organizations have increased regarding inclusion over the years. More and more people have been getting involved. Likewise, the number of schools affected by inclusion has multiplied. The education system has been changing towards equality for all students. Increasingly, many individuals have realized the benefits of this movement. As humans, freedom has always been one of our strongest passions. It brings us joy to know that we are all being refined in the culture of equality. Educating all children to the utmost extent possible in a regular classroom is one of the noblest movements of mankind. We must then say yes to inclusive education since it fights for the rights of all children to be full members of the society. Some people think that inclusion is not the best option for all cases. Several think that it is unfair for the other students to be compromised. …for example, children with hearing impairments may be in segregated classrooms or at home to concentrate on learning sign language (Deiner, 1999, p. 31). … A number of individuals still have misconceptions about inclusion. Others just define it with their own understanding. Furthermore, definitions have evolved and influenced by a country’s legislation. Some teachers who have to face the challenges are ill-equipped on how to handle the situation. In reality, there are educators who have to accept the inclusive classroom setting without appropriate knowledge and experience. Traditionally, children with special needs are not included in assessment standards. This makes it hard for several systems to evaluate their respective performances. In actual settings, teachers, including volunteers, are not enough to manage the learning process inside the classroom. According to the U.S. Department of Education (2007), 53.6% of children with disabilities are served in regular classrooms. With this population, more educators are undeniably needed to be thoroughly trained concerning teaching children with disabilities. Clearly, inclusion brings about a change in the education system that everyone needs to be prepared of since the special education, as well as the regular system, are affected in this alteration. To address the other teachers’ qualms regarding inclusion, a collaborative approach can be helpful in communicating the necessary information. It is understandable that many professionals are still in the denial stage regarding inclusion. In due time, they will be able to have acceptance, understanding, and eventually knowledge about the process of inclusion. Almost all schools are already pushing for this undertaking to succeed. Sooner or later, more compelling regulations are likely to be endorsed.