How the Laws of Obligation Help to Guide Human Behaviour in Several Ways

As covered in the Learning Outcome 1, the obligation is defined as the “duty” or according to Civic Code Arts 1156-1304, it described as “a judicial necessity to give, to do or not to do” something. As a matter of fact, obligations are outlined in contracts which
(1) Contractual obligations, breaches, remedies, and the laws: The Learning Outcomes 1 gives comprehensive explanations on what a contract means. that is, as a legally binding document that spells out the details of an agreement between two or more partners for the purpose of achieving an end (Lawson and Singleton, 2006). Sometimes, individuals or corporate bodies fail to discharge their own assigned duties as stipulated in the contractual agreement leading to unpardonable breaches that could cost financial losses in the case of Douglas &amp. Ors v. Hello! Ltd &amp. Ors [2007] UKHL 21. Appropriate remedies may be computed and paid to the victims or the claimants affected by these contractual breaches. However, the rate at which contracts have been discredited and breached is surprisingly increasing—and this may due to the fact that personal disloyalty and deceit has been on the rise across the globe.
(2) Different types of torts (e.g false imprisonment, deceit, nuisance, defamation etc) and human rights issue: According to the Learning Outcomes 1, an entity that has been affected by a contract breach may go for contract rescission and seek rescission remedies. This situation has given rise to the increased claims for torts in its various forms: there are torts of deceit, nuisance and false imprisonment. All these problems are due to the fact that many entities are breaking their contracts with one another and shying away from their fiduciary duties as stipulated in the contract. The Guardian UK in 2000 recorded the first remedies offered to a farm manager as a result of proprietary estoppels which occurred because of the soured relationship between the landowner and the manager (farmer),&nbsp.whose name was removed from the owner’s will after their warm relationship collapsed (Kelso, 2000).&nbsp.