How has the solicitor’s regulation changed in the UK

In this paper, a position is taken that the most effective form of change to regulation relating to solicitors can only achieve its intended purposes if the changes are comprehensive and holistic enough. In the light of this, changes that have taken place over the years by way of training system as well as regulatory structure governing solicitors are all subjected to critical review. There will also be a special review of the Human Rights Act 1998 to examine how it has impacted on the regulation of solicitors. The issue of self-regulation by the solicitors’ profession will also be reviewed.
Training and ethics are two important phenomena in ensuring quality standard of practice by solicitors everywhere across the globe (Cooper, 2013). This is because through training, prospective lawyers are given the kind of education and professional nurturing, needed to ensure that they go about their duties as exceptional professionals. Meanwhile, a person’s individual ethical standards can also be a determining factor as to whether or not the person would heed to training instructions and practice professionally (Boon, 2014). To reconcile these two positions therefore, it is important that the training system for solicitors in UK will be structured in a way that ensures that only people who can be deemed as ethical individuals are admitted. Indeed many have questioned the importance of ensuring that admission for training for solicitors is based on only people who can be considered as ethical individuals. In response to this, Case (2013) observed that the law profession is a highly sensitive one, requiring strong and high standards of practice to ensure that a practitioner will hold fast to doing what is right. What this means is that lawyers have a lot of discretion in their practice as far as their actions are based on law. For this reason, it is