End of Module assesment work

One similarity is that both articles are exploring the issues of school pupils and students, together with the problems that they face. One article examines how pupils in mixed secondary schools within the UK together with their teachers experience pupil voice. It problematizes the philosophy of pupil voice, examining the idea of young people being enabled to influence the outcomes of their own education, highlighting the need for them to speak out about issues concerning them. The other article explores the feelings of students towards the literary lessons in an academic year, together with their behavior towards it (Carter-Steel &amp. Al-Hakim 2009). A difference occurs in that while one article is a study of the feelings of several students over a course of time, the other is just an article that examines the experiences of teachers and students about a certain issue, and it does not involve an actual study. The pupil voice article applies visual methods to find out how the pupils’ voice, discipline, and engagement are carried out within a school, while the primary classroom article applies an actual study of the pupils involved. It uses a typology of the pupils on a basis an analysis of the school policy’s documentation (Fisher 2011). …
The pupil voice article is a study of how secondary school students express their feelings and ideas to their teachers such that they will be heard and understood. It offers advice on how the pupils and students can do this in the best possible way. The primary classroom article on the other hand, explores the perception of the students towards their lessons and the academic year as a whole, providing examples of how they are dissatisfied with the learning process although they comply with the rules and regulations. This is an apparent similarity in scope that is present in the two articles (Fisher 2011). Perhaps the only difference in the scope of the two articles occurs in the study area explored. In the primary classroom article, its study involved only the pupils that are in year six of their primary education. Although it sampled over 100 pupils, it limited its study area to just a certain class year, as opposed to the pupil voice article. The pupil voice article has a wide study area that is an urban secondary school for students aged between 11 and 16 years old. This means that unlike the classroom article, it examines students of several class years, not just one, thus it has a wider sampling data (Carter-Steel &amp. Al-Hakim 2009). Similarities and differences in paradigm Paradigm involves a set of forms all of them containing a certain theme. In the two articles, the common theme is the expression of pupils and students’ feelings while they are at school. Both articles explore this theme using several ways or forms, both of which have similarities as well as differences. One similarity in the forms is the use of study techniques and study methods, involving the examination of a certain group of pupils and students. The primary