Effects of Growing Aging Population on the Work Force

Due to the age populations, societies have been altered (Swarts, 2009). For instance, unlike in the past, aged people are now found working even after retirement age. These changes have led to several consequences. This paper seeks to explore the effects that the aged population have on the workforce of Canada as a country. The paper discusses these effects by relating the relationships between old-aged workforce and both societal structures and norms. It adopts the theory that old age accrues some substantial effects to the nature of the country’s workforce. Research results from Canada’s labour industry play a role in the justification of this thesis. It then looks at how these results influence the norms and structure of the society. It tries to prove that the society has interdependent elements. Economic demands and inflation are some of the pressures that push the old to extend their work periods to the extremes of old age. In addition, everyone wishes to remain economically active throughout their lifespan, unless they are prohibited by unavoidable health conditions.
According to Conen (2013), the Canadian population is aging quickly than ever before, and the tendency has extensive implications for several aspects of the society. Conen pointed out that median age was 39.9 years in 2011. He claimed that the median age of 2011 implied that half the population was older than the younger generation. In 1971, median age was 26.2 years. The seniors thus consist of fastest-growing age group. The tendency is envisioned to continue as the average number of children is low. In 2011, about 5 million Canadians aged over 65 years of age. The size of the population is projected to double in the coming 25 years to about 10.4 million people by 2036.
For Canada (2012), in 2011, Nova Scotia had the highest number of aged people. Compared to the total population of the aged, Nova Scotia had