Dulera (mometasone furoate + formoterol fumarate dihydrate) Treatment

Dulera should only be used by people whose asthma isn’t adequately controlled with a different class of drug’ (Doctors’ lounge 2001-2011). FDA approval of Dulera was based on clinical testing of 12-26 weeks among 1509 people.
‘Dulera is a pressurized metered-dose inhaler with a built-in numeric counter that shows the number of remaining doses. Dulera will be available for patients 12 years of age and older in two strengths: Dulera 100 mcg/5 mcg and Dulera 200 mcg/5 mcg. Each inhalation contains 5 mcg of formoterol fumarate and either 100 mcg or 200 mcg of mometasone furoate. The recommended starting dose is based on prior asthma therapy. The maximum daily recommended dose is two inhalations of Dulera 200 mcg/5 mcg twice daily every day in the morning and evening. Dulera is expected to be available in retail pharmacies nationwide by the end of July 2010’ (Businesswire 2010).
For the method of action, ‘Dulera contains both mometasone furoates and formoterol fumarate, therefore, the mechanisms of actions described for the individual components apply to Dulera. The drugs represent two different classes of medications (a synthetic corticosteroid and a selective long-acting beta2-adrenergic receptor agonist) that have different effects on clinical, physiological, and inflammatory indices of asthma. Mometasone furoate is a corticosteroid demonstrating potent anti-inflammatory activity. The precise mechanism of corticosteroid action on asthma is not known. Inflammation is an important component in the pathogenesis of asthma. Corticosteroids have been shown to have a wide range of inhibitory effects on multiple cell types (e.g. mast cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes) and mediators (e.g. histamine, eicosanoids, leukotrienes, and cytokines) involved in inflammation and in the asthmatic response.