Discuss whether the division between virtual and real is becoming more blurred through the use of augmented reality

It is a part of common sense that we rarely can view it. It is an idea according to which each individual has a mind. The constituents of the mind include faiths, apprehensions, anticipations, motivations, yearnings, etc. The continuity of our minds is the source of our personality and identity as individuals.
In the past couple of centuries we have also become convinced that this common-sense psychology is rooted in the brain. These mental conditions and occurrences are somehow going on in the neurophysiological systems of the brain. So this leaves us with two stages at which we can illustrate and elaborate human beings: a level of common-sense psychology, which seems to operate well enough in practice although not scientific. and a level of neurophysiology, which is definitely scientific. However, the most modern specialists know very little about the level of neurophysiology (Searle, 2007, p. 1).
What we call minds are merely very complicated digital computer programs. Mental states are only computer states and mental procedures are computational systems. Any process whatever that had the correct program, with the correct input and output, would have to have mental conditions and systems in the same literal sense that we do. The programs in question are self-modifying or self-structuring systems of representations (Searle, 2007, p. 2. Calvin, 1987). The fast progress of computers may indicate the possibility of these machines replacing human brain and emulate human intelligence.
It is apparent that at least some human mental capabilities are algorithmic. It follows that a person could not find out that the brain or anything else was inherently a digital computer. A person can allocate a computational interpretation to it. Some physical arrangements make possible the computational application much better than others. That is why we put