Determinants of Plasma Retinol and BetaCarotene Levels

The statistical analysis demonstrated that for this showed that sex was significant at the .000 level. Additionally, the research should that the strength of the connection was .045.
Regarding the first hypotheses, the research showed conclusively that the null hypothesis could be rejected. As such, the research hypothesis — Sex would not have the same impact on the occurrence of Plasma Retinol (ng/ml) levels as it does on Plasma beta-carotene (ng/ml) levels – was accepted. Regarding the second hypothesis, the research showed that the null hypothesis could not be rejected and that research hypothesis that a correlation exists between the occurrence of Plasma Retinol (ng/ml) and Plasma beta-carotene (ng/ml) in the body could be rejected.
The first test that was carried out was a regression analysis. This regression analysis examined the correlation between sex and plasma Retinol (ng/ml) levels. As noted, this test demonstrated that there was a significant correlation between the two variables. The second test that was carried out was also a regression analysis. This test instead examined the connection between sex and plasma beta-carotene (ng/ml) in the body. This test demonstrated that there was not a significant connection between the variables. Finally, the third test that was carried out was an independent samples t-test. This test examined whether or not a correlation existed between plasma retinol (ng/ml) levels and Plasma beta-carotene (ng/ml). This research showed that a connection did not exist between these two