Describe how campaigns for public office are organized Why is it important to secure the undecided voters in a close election In your own estimation what were the significant domestic and foreign policy issues in the 2008 presidential campaign

In other words, those voters who have claimed, either truthfully or not, that they have yet to place their allegiance to a specific candidate or political party. Such closeness that highlights the need for considerable effort being put into the format of public campaigns, so that each candidate at the end of the race will be able to say that they worked as hard as they could for every single vote, including those that were at anytime considered to be undecided. In the quest for public office, the candidate with the strongest campaign is faced with the real possibility of winning at the end of the day. To win, it becomes imperative to have the necessary money/people involved with the campaign, garner as much of the undecided vote as possible and to understand the relevant domestic/international issues of the present election cycle.
To form a campaign, “New candidates for public office often lack the organizational support base that incumbents often have already at their disposal. This means they have to build a grassroots activist base from scratch. Smart campaigns focus on the integration of direct contact tools – phones, Internet, mail, door-to-door – to create a support network of activist volunteers. Such an organizational program has as its goal the building of a large, functioning grassroots organization for your campaign – be it for a candidate or an issue. Despite the help your campaign may receive from party committees, elected officials and a variety of political committees and interest groups, smart campaigns also build organizations of their own, grassroots structures that are primarily loyal to your candidate or cause. Building such an organization takes time, money and attention. And to do it most efficiently and effectively, it requires extensive use of careful polling, targeting, Internet transactions, telephone calling, direct mail and informal person-to-person contact,” (Faucheux, p.1).