Deconstruction component of the 1998 and 2001 film RUSH HOUR

However, the two films also portrayed negative aspects of films, including the fact that they both perpetuate stereotypes of the two characters – Tuckers character is the stereotypical black man, and Chans character is the stereotypical clueless foreigner. Another negative aspect is that the two films minimize Chinese culture, despite the fact that one of the leads is Chinese, and much of the action in both films takes place in Hong Kong. This paper will attempt to show scenes in which the stereotyping, the cultural differences, and the overall disrespect for Chinese culture are more pronounced.
The two movies are very similar in tone, but different at the same time. The biggest difference is that, in the first film, the two men become acquainted with one another. In the second film, there is not a need to build the relationship between the two men, as the relationship is already established. This is how the two movies differ in how they build tension. For instance, in the first movie, the tension at the start of the movie comes from the fact that the two men do not know one another, and that there are cultural differences between them (Min, 2011). The cultural differences, of course, changes between the first movie and the second movie, depending upon where the movie is set – Hong Kong or Los Angeles. In Hong Kong, Chans character is “Michael,” while Tuckers character is “Tito.” In Los Angeles, Tuckers character is “Michael,” while Chans character is “Tito” – in other words, in Hong Kong, Chan is the top dog, and Tucker is to follow his lead with the cultural differences. In Los Angeles, it is the opposite.
This change in culture is apparent in two different scenes, one in the first movie, and one in the second movie. The two sequences that will be described are important, because they each show how culture, and not knowing the language and culture of the non-native country, can get people into trouble.