Cultural Diversities in the Graying Population of the Caucasian American and Asian American Races

Identified by the U.S. Bureau of Census (2000) are the five diverse racial groups—Caucasian Americans, Asian Americans, African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanic/Latino Americans.&nbsp.&nbsp.Identified by the U.S. Bureau of Census (2000) are the five diverse racial groups—Caucasian Americans, Asian Americans, African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanic/Latino Americans.&nbsp.&nbsp.The highest rising and the most diverse race in the U.S. is the Asian Americans, with more than 40 ethnic groups of over a hundred languages/dialects. In 1960, Asian Americans were estimated at 1 million or 0.5% of the entire US population. Four decades after, they were estimated to be 10,242,998 or 3.7% of the populace. By 2025, the U.S. Census Bureau projected a 100% increase. Around 70% of Asian Americans are not born in the U.S., and Asian immigrants comprise 2.6% of the total US population (Kramer, Kwong, Lee &amp. Chung, 2002).&nbsp. &nbsp.&nbsp.

The Caucasian Americans, also called European Americans, or White Americans, are the largest but slowest growing group with the lowest poverty rate (“United States of America: Poverty and Wealth,” 2010), which began arriving after the Revolutionary War in the 1800s. In 1996, the Caucasian American group comprised 75% of the U.S. population and projected to be roughly 53% of the total U.S. population by 2050 due to its declining size (Day, 1996).&nbsp. The more the population of the U.S is “graying,” the more it becomes culturally diversified. With the multiplicity of races residing in the nation, the government is faced with issues on employment and sustained an income, adequate supply of goods, preservation of socioeconomic status, retirement benefits, and old-age care and services for the elderly (Adams &amp. Ekerdt, 2002).The Elderly Population in the U.S.
According to Hetzel and Smith (2001), there are 35 million people, aged 65 and older, belonging to the elderly population. Today, the elderly group is 12% of the total U.S. population and is expected to rise by 8% or 69.4 million in 20 years. Records from the 2000 U.S. Census Bureau show that the Asian American elderly group rose by 76% from 1990 to 2000. and from 2000 to 2025, it is estimated growth of around 250%. The Caucasian American elderly group, from 74 % in 1995 is expected to be 53 % by 2050 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2000).