Cognitive Therapy Behavioral Therapy Both or Neither

&nbsp.As another example, Albert Ellis (1913 – ), a pioneer in rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT), which some consider a precursor to cognitive therapy, was described as “…originally a psychoanalyst but ultimately rejected the psychodynamic approach.” (Eisner, 2000). Aaron Beck (1921 – ) arguably the true founder of cognitive therapy, “…initially conducted research into psychoanalytic theories of depression, but when these hypotheses were disconfirmed, he developed a different theoretical-clinical approach that he labeled cognitive therapy.” (University of Pennsylvania Health System, A Biography of Aaron T. Beck, MD, n.d., para. 2).
Behavioral therapy is most commonly associated with B.F. Skinner (1904-1990), though the original work should certainly be credited to John Watson. Although these four researchers may be recognized for their contributions to psychology by name, they too credit the many other researchers, philosophers, and physicians who contributed to their knowledge base and the work they did.
John Watson, known as the founder of behaviorism, started his graduate studies at the University of Chicago in philosophy but switched to psychology, and received his degree in that field. However, soon he joined the faculty at Johns Hopkins University in Maryland and became one of the few psychologists to establish and do research in animal psychology. Apparently cognitive therapy has proven to be very successful. In a press release by the National Academies (Institute of Medicine), dated October 9, 2006, announcing that Aaron Beck had been awarded the Institute of Medicine’s 2006 Lienhard Award, it states, “In the United States, approximately 25 to 30 percent of clinical and counseling psychologists, and 20 percent to 25 percent of all mental health professionals now use cognitive therapy in their practices, reaching some 3 million to 5 million patients in the U.S. alone. &nbsp.