CocaCola and the Evolution of Advertising

41000 Christened Coca-Cola by Pemberton’s accountant, the bookkeeper spelled out the product’s name in his distinctive script, which remains an integral part of the brand to this day. (heritage.coca-cola.com)Christened Coca-Cola by Pemberton’s accountant, the bookkeeper spelled out the product’s name in his distinctive script, which remains an integral part of the brand to this day. (heritage.coca-cola.com) Bought by local tycoon Asa Candler in 1886, the formula was bottled and marketed across the nation. &nbsp.Early ads featured ladies and children to an inordinate degree. &nbsp.The subjects were bright-eyed and cherub-cheeked, conservative images even for the time. &nbsp.The first “celebrity spokesperson” was a Boston actress named Hilda Clark. &nbsp.This is an early example of the use of famous persons as company spokespeople (http://www.dirjournal.com). Aside from their visual components, each ad also touted the merits of the drink. &nbsp.The word that appeared over and over was “refreshed.” &nbsp.The website &nbsp. http://www.dirjournal.comhas a display of Coke images over the years that show this. &nbsp.An ad from the 1890s features both a grown man and a young boy sipping the soft drink at a lunch counter. &nbsp.Beneath this are the words “It satisfies the thirsty and helps the weary.” &nbsp. A second one from the same era shows gaily dressed women at a restaurant table. &nbsp.On a sign behind them, the message “Coca-Cola revives and sustains” is presented. &nbsp.Developing this theme, later advertisements urged drinkers to “shop refreshed,” “lunch refreshed,” and “drive refreshed.” Appeals to the drink’s invigorating power are likely references to its high caffeine content. &nbsp.This is known in marketing circles as “transformational appeal.” (Advertising appeal) &nbsp.The underlying message is that using the promoted product will effect positive change in the consumer. &nbsp.This same strategy used today in commercials for makeup, skin care products, and home exercise equipment. &nbsp.In the late 1800s, the pitch of choice for Coca-Cola is that it would transform weary, worn out people into ones bursting with vigor and pep.