1 Individuals come under overlapping jurisdictions from many different governments

Detail how you

Question

1. Individuals come under overlapping jurisdictions from many different governments. Detail how you

specifically help fund and receive benefits from at least three different levels of government under whose jurisdiction you fall.

2. The US is the world leader in weather reporting, providing benefit to the US and many other countries as well. There is huge external benefit to providing this to the world at large. However, there is a huge cost as well and most of it is borne by the US. US citizens pay taxes that support weather reporting that benefits many countries that do not share in the cost. Should we charge them? Should we refuse to provide information to free riders? Discuss.

3. Discuss pollution in the following context: a) What are the social benefits of curbing/abatement of pollution? b) What are the social cost of curbing/abatement of pollution (yes, there are some)? c) How can marginal cost and abatement be used to help select the optimal point for regulating pollution?

4. Critical Thinking: Consider a class of 25 Microeconomics students, some of whom are confused about a concept after a professor explains it. A student who reveals his confusion by asking a question loses 10utils. However, when the professor clarifies the concept, each confused student benefits 2utils.

At what level of confusion (number of confused students) is a question from a confused student socially efficient?

Without participation incentives, will a confused student ask a question when it would be socially efficient? How will they know it is socially efficient?

How would you design an incentive system to generate questions from confused students?

5. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/19/us/conflict-over-soil-and-water-quality-puts-iowa-nice-to-a-test.html?ref=topics_r=0Running head: LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT Name: Institution: 1 LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT
1. 2 Funding and benefits from different levels of government.
National government; the national government raises…

Economics

Use Google Scholar or the Library tab on Blackboard to find a research study in any area that involves hypothesis

Question

Use Google Scholar or the Library tab on Blackboard to find a research study in any area that involves hypothesis

testing. Describe the study, hypothesis test, null/aernative hypothesis, alpha value, one or two-tailed test, resus, and inferences made. Explain the inferences you make from these resus, importance of this data in general, how it relates to one’s life, and what you find interesting about the study.

State the Null Ho amp; Aernative H, Hypothesis
Ho : (07 – 0;) =
( The variance of experiment and simulated data are
NOT different)
H : (0 ] – 0; )#
(The variance of experiment and simulated data…
Statistics and Probability

INITIAL QUESTION Mary a registered nurse decided that she wants to become a CNP She

Question

INITIAL QUESTION:

Mary, a registered nurse, decided that she wants to become a CNP. She

applied and was accepted to the Family Nurse Practitioner program at Chamberlain College of Nursing. She received a course curriculum which outlined the courses necessary to complete her degree. One of the early courses in the program curriculum is NR-501 Theoretical Basis for Advanced Nursing Practice.

You are a student colleague of Mary’s enrolled in the same class. On the class QA discussion board, Mary posted, I took nursing theory classes fifteen years ago in my bachelor’s program. I don’t understand why I need to take theory classes again.

Discussion Question:

How would you respond? Develop a logical response to Mary’s post. Provide evidence to support your arguments.

ANSWER:

I would initially react by first elucidating Mary immensely for having the courage to admit she has not taken a nursing theory course and being upfront and honest with her peers and professor. The nursing world is ever changing. Nursing theory is displayed in undergraduate bachelor degree programs with the purpose of understanding the foundations of the present and best practice. While in practice, all heah professionals, including nursing and other disciplines, demonstrate a form of evidence-based practice. Within nursing literature, most articles related to nursing theory are for nurses to learn to use nursing theory as the framework for patient care. It is essential for Mary to study nursing theory and its useful methods, such as incorporating theory into her own practice. It can encourage organizational support of nursing theoretical frameworks, satisfaction of patients cared for, improvement of patient care, and professional growth of nurses. I believe that all heah professionals depend on comparative focus feelings concerning the sciences that guide them. Florence Nightingale and Dorothea Orem are examples of our forefathers of the nursing practice. They paved the path to what has lead to the way nursing practice has evolved today. Being that Mary is a registered nurse for fifteen years, and has completed a nursing program that has given her incite to the background of nursing, she is already aware of how to discuss her practice to the class. With Mary’s years of experience, I believe she will find nursing theory more interesting and informative then she may expect, and can take back what she’s learned to apply in her own practice and vice versa.

Reference

Alligood, M. R. (2014). I would argue on Mary as a registered nurse. This advanced exemplary presents
legitimate, up and coming portrayals and examinations of 28 nursing theory in a flexible,
compact organization. With…

Science

I look forward to see your analysis and insights 1 How do market drivers and trends factor

Question

I look forward to see your analysis and insights.

1.How do market drivers and trends factor

into the development of a successful positioning strategy for JFFD in West Hollywood?

2.What market needs or pain points does JFFD address specifically with its product and open kitchen model?

3. Does JFFD’s messaging strategy have a global appeal or does it need to be adapted for success in the West Hollywood market?

4.What role does the retail concept (e.g., open kitchen) play in supporting the brand’s position? Is this an important element for the brand in its new West Hollywood location?

5.What role could JFFD’s promotional elements play in creating awareness of JFFD’s relevant message among the West Hollywood community of dog lovers?

And here is the book that is being used in this class

Principles of Marketing, by Kotler Armstrong, 16Running head: CASE STUDY ANALYSIS Case Study Analysis
Student Name
Course Name
August 02, 2017 1 CASE STUDY ANALYSIS 2 Case Study Analysis
1. A positioning strategy is a marking design or…

Marketing

This is my Bioethics home work thx All the requirement I have uploaded already

Question

This is my Bioethics home work. thx . All the requirement I have uploaded already.

Case 1.
In the given case study related with the assisted suicide with the help of doctor I
completely disagree that woman should go far for this as she has underwent lot of hardships in
life but…
Other Subjects

MENTAL HEALTH CASES STUDY!!! Case Study Mohr

CHAPTER 2, Neuroscience: Biology and

Question

MENTAL HEAH CASES STUDY!!!

Case Study, Mohr: CHAPTER 2, Neuroscience: Biology and

Behavior

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Discuss neuroplasticity and how this concept relates to mental heah and mental illness.

Briefly explain the importance of interaction between genes and environment, the role of endophenotypes, and the stress-diathesis model of psychiatric illness.

1. Michael is a 22-year-old college senior whose GPA has declined with this semester’s grades. Michael plans to apply to medical school and thinks that the lower GPA may prevent his acceptance to medical school. For the last 2 weeks, Michael has skipped most classes because he has insomnia and fatigue. Michael is now very depressed and has been thinking of suicide. He took a loaded gun from his father’s gun cabinet and then wrote a suicide note to his family. At the last moment, he telephoned 911 and told them of his suicide plan. The police came, took the gun away, and then took Michael to the city hospital to be admitted for psychiatric treatment. In the admission interview with the psychiatric nurse, Michael said that his pastor thought that only weak-willed people experienced depression and that it was a punishment for personal sins and the sins of one’s ancestors. Michael told the nurse that he must be weak-willed and will never be able to accomplish anything. The psychiatric nurse explained that muiple factors are the cause of depression. The nurse told Michael that one theory holds that an imbalance of neurotransmitters, or chemical messengers of the brain, occurs in depression. Neurotransmitters influence the individual’s emotions, thoughts, and subsequent behavior. Recent research implies that neurobiology, heredity, as well as Psychological and environmental factors may be involved in the development and progression of depression.

(Learning Objectives: 5, 6)

a. Will Michael think that the psychiatric nurse’s explanation for the cause of depression is more correct than that of his pastor?

b. Michael asks the nurse why he has to have psychotherapy. He states that he only needs to take a couple of pills to get better. How should the nurse respond to Michael’s question and comment?

c. Develop an assessment question for each of the following possible causes of Michael’s development of depression:

Genetic, Environment and Stress.

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 3, Conceptual Frameworks and Theories:

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objective:

Give examples of behavioral and cognitive-behavioral interventions.

The student nurse has been assigned a 37-year-old woman admitted to the psychiatric hospital with an anxiety disorder. This morning, the student notices that the client has a tense facial expression and is walking constantly around the group room. The student walked over to the client and used reflective communication by stating, I see that you have a tense expression and are walking around almost all of the time. Is there something that we could discuss? The client replied that she has talked on the telephone to her mother who was keeping her children while she was in the hospital. The client said that her mother had told her that she was not a good mother, and then said, I guess I am a bad mother, but I could never measure up to my mother’s expectations. The student has learned that negative self-talk can greatly aggravate anxiety and lead to depression. The student decided to use a behavioral intervention with the client and asked the client who is a good artist and why the client liked the artist’s works. The student and the client then made a list of activities that the client liked. The student taught the client to engage in one of these activities when an unpleasant experience evoked negative thoughts. The following day, the student decided that the client needed some cognitive restructuring for her relationship with her mother. The student taught the client that during discussions with her mother, feelings of incompetence might be experienced when the mother made negative comments. The client was instructed that if her mother made negative comments about parenting, she was to immediately tell her mother that she was a good parent to her children and terminate the conversation at the first opportunity.

(Learning Objective: 3)

a. Will the client be able to learn cognitive restructuring in her relationship with her mother?

b. How will engaging in activities help the client with her anxiety?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 4, Evidence-Based Practice

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objective:

Define evidence-based care.

1. Jessica, a 17-year-old girl who came with her family from Romania to the United States 10 years ago, is brought to the mental heah clinic by her mother. At the admission psychiatric interview, the mother stated that Jessica has been saying for 6 months that aliens have been conducting experiments on her and will soon take her in a spaceship to their planet. Jessica is often awake at night and roams the house with a hammer and sharp knife, searching for aliens. Jessica’s mother says that she fears that some night Jessica will harm a family member whom she believes to be an alien. The mother then said that she did not bring Jessica for psychiatric care earlier because she had heard that much of mental heah treatment was quackery and a waste of money. The psychiatric nurse explains to Jessica’s mother that all mental heah treatment is based on scientific principles.

(Learning Objective: 3)

a. How would the nurse best explain that the care Jessica will receive at the psychiatric facility is based on evidence? Give two examples of psychiatric evidence-based care, and explain the scientific evidence that supports your examples.

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 5, Legal and Ethical Aspects: In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives: Identify the basic rights of people with mental illness. Describe the different types of commitments and states of competency.

1. Gerald, a 22-year-old black man, has a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder. Gerald has been living at home, but this afternoon he had a physical fight with the neighbors and set a fire in their garage to burn their house. His father took him to the local psychiatric hospital and said that he wants an involuntary commitment for Gerald since he will not agree to the hospitalization. The father expressed concern over Gerald’s legal rights. The psychiatric nurse practitioner recommends to the father that he commit Gerald on involuntarily for emergency care for a period of 72 hours since he is clearly a danger to others. The nurse explains that Gerald will be evaluated to determine if he needs involuntary detention for observation and treatment for a longer period of time. The nurse explains that Gerald will be periodically evaluated, and that when it is determined that he is no longer a danger to others or himself, Gerald will be released from the hospital.

(Learning Objectives: 4, 5)

a. What basic legal rights does Gerald have at the time of this illness?

b. Why can Gerald not make the decision for himself about being an involuntary emergency commitment to the hospital?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 6, Cuure

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objective:

Describe skills essential to the implementation of cuurally competent care.

1. Mrs. Maria Gonzalez is a Mexican National, age 58, who was brought to a heah clinic by her adu son. She is complaining that she has had aches and pains all over her body for 2 days. Mrs. Gonzalez states that her neighbor is a witch who gave her the mal do ojo (evil eye) and cast a spell on her to cause her death. The clinic nurse takes an oral temperature and it is 101º F. The clinic nurse refers Mrs. Gonzales to the clinic physician because she believes that the client has influenza. Mrs. Gonzales is reluctant to see the doctor and states that the doctor cannot prevent her death.

(Learning Objective: 8)

a. How can the nurse provide cuurally competent care to Mrs. Gonzalez and convince her to see the clinic doctor?

b. Can Mrs. Gonzalez be convinced that there is no spell cast on her to cause her death? Explain your answer.

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 8,- Nursing Values, Attitudes, and Self-Awareness

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objective:

Discuss how situational factors can potentially influence the behavior of heahcare professionals toward clients with mental illness.

1. Joe, a 26-year-old Caucasian man, is a client in a state prison system. Joe is admitted to the prison clinic after being involved in a fight in which he sustained a stab wound to the chest that did not penetrate the lungs or major blood vessels. The clinic doctor on duty was an employee of several years at the prison. The doctor showed little compassion for Joe, stating, He is a convicted criminal, and he is just getting back some of what he deserves. The new graduate nurse who was being oriented to the clinic thought that the doctor did not exhibit professional behavior toward Joe. The clinic nursing supervisor later explained that the doctor was influenced by situational factors.

(Learning Objective: 3)

  • What is a situational factor, and how can this influence the behavior of heahcare workers? Provide an example where a situational factor impacted on your behavior while in a heahcare setting.

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 9, the Nursing Process in Psychiatric–Mental Heah Care

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objective:

Apply the nursing process to psychiatric–mental heah nursing.

1. The student nurse is assigned to assist the psychiatric nurse with the admission interview of a client at the psychiatric hospital. The nurse explains to the student that the interview is very important in obtaining a total heah history of the client. The nurse should be courteous and respectful of the client to obtain as much information from the client as possible. Assessment information should include the subjective information from the client with the reason for needing treatment, the cause of the present problem(s), and the client’s expectation of the outcome of treatment regimen. The nurse alerts the student to the need to be sensitive to both verbal and nonverbal behavior of the client and to focus on topics that seem important to the client.

(Learning Objective: 1)

a. How can attention to the client’s nonverbal cues be of value in an interview?

b. Why is the interview the most important aspect of the nursing process?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 10, the Interview and Assessment Process

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objective:

Describe essential elements to include in psychiatric interviews and the assessment process.

  • The student nurse is accompanying the psychiatric nurse during the nursing interview and assessment of a newly admitted patient. The psychiatric nurse told the student that preparation with subjective and objective data collection is an important part of the process. The nurse explains that assessment has reference to the interviewer’s interpretation and prioritization of all data for the client. The nurse must have self-awareness and self-knowledge to be objective and avoid influencing the responses of the client. Anxiety on the part of the nurse may limit the ability for thorough data collection and interpretation. Anxiety in the nurse may evoke anxiety on the part of the client. The psychiatric nurse stressed that a process recording, or written analysis of the interaction between the client and nurse, is essential for nurses to recognize the effects of their communication style in the assessment process. A review of the client’s history is important, and a private setting for the interview is necessary. The content of the nursing assessment should include the ability and reliability of the client’s response to questions of the interviewer and the skill of the nurse in identification of relevant facts. The nurse should discuss with the client prior heah history, any present illness, and the reason for seeking heahcare at this time. Medication history with compliance and allergies of the client require investigation. Substance use by the client, past illnesses, and family history need exploration.

(Learning Objective: 2)

a The student nurse asked the clinical psychiatric nurse practitioner to explain what she considered the most essential part of the assessment process. How should the psychiatric nurse respond to the student’s question? Explain your answer.

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 11, Therapeutic Relationships and Communication

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

List the key ingredients of therapeutic relationships. Contrast effective and ineffective communication techniques with clients.

1. Two student nurses are preparing for psychiatric–mental heah clinical learning experiences. They decided to review the assigned reading and lecture notes from their class on therapeutic communication. After discussion, the students decided that the elements of respect, genuineness, and caring in talking to clients could lead to a trusting relationship. Both students voiced concern over their ability to develop and maintain a professional and not a social relationship.

(Learning Objectives: 1, 6)

a. How can the student nurses convey the essential elements of a therapeutic relationship in talking to clients?

b. How can the student nurses maintain a professional relationship and avoid a social one for clients in psychiatric settings?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 12, Working with the Muidisciplinary Team

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objective:

Discuss the role of muidisciplinary teams in the care of clients.

1. A muidisciplinary team meeting is in progress for Cindy, a 21-year-old college student who has recently been diagnosed with schizophrenia. Cindy had been an excellent student on the dean’s list until 2 weeks ago, when she stopped attending classes, stayed in her room with the blinds drawn, and refused to eat because they have poisoned the food. The team includes Cindy’s psychiatrist, primary nurse, unit psychologist, social worker, occupational therapist, and a registered dietician. Cindy and her parents attend the team meeting. The team members introduced themselves and stated that they would monitor and coordinate the treatment plan for Cindy, evaluate her progress in treatment, and plan for her discharge.

(Learning Objective: 1)

  • How will the muidisciplinary team help Cindy and her family in the treatment of her schizophrenia?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 13, Individual Therapies and Nursing Interventions

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objective:

Discuss the goals of therapeutic modalities used with individual clients.

1. Frank, a 16-year-old adolescent, is a high school sophomore. Frank is on the verge of failing his Spanish class. After his grade fell to a D grade, Frank procrastinated about doing his Spanish homework, postponing it until last. Then, saying he was tired, Frank played video games until bedtime and rationalized that he would get up early in the morning and do his homework. Frank often sleeps late and does not have time to complete his Spanish homework. Frank is now very distressed over his grade in the Spanish class. His mother brought Frank to the counselor to help with his problem. The counselor suggested a parent-teacher conference to explore any learning difficuies and the possibility of a tutor to help Frank. The counselor also said that perhaps Frank’s mother could supervise the completion of his Spanish homework as the first step. Frank appeared relieved at these suggestions, and said, That sounds great! Maybe I can improve my Spanish grade and pass the class. Then I won’t be a loser!

(Learning Objective: 2)

a. Using a cognitive-behavioral approach, write three goals for Frank’s individual counseling sessions.

b. Explain why cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) can be successful for Frank.

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 14, Groups and Group Interventions

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Discuss the advantages of group therapy.

Discuss the nurse’s role in working with groups.

1. Mary, a student nurse, is studying for an upcoming examination in her psychiatric–mental heah nursing class. Mary is reviewing group psychiatric therapy and made some practice test questions on this topic. Help Mary study by answering the following questions.

(Learning Objectives: 7, 10)

a. Why does group therapy benefit clients with a psychiatric diagnosis?

  • How can the psychiatric nurse best facilitate a community support group?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 15, Families and Family Interventions

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objective:

Describe the family as a system adapting to change.

1. Wanda, a 17-year-old high school senior, has been rejected by a boy in her chemistry class whom she wanted to date for the senior prom. Wanda became severely depressed and attempted suicide with an overdose of barbiturates. Wanda’s mother found her unconscious and called an emergency ambulance to take her to the emergency department at the local hospital. After Wanda’s recovery, she was in individual counseling, and the psychiatrist referred all family members for counseling. Naomi, her younger sister, refused to go, saying that she did not have a problem and that Wanda was the one who had tried to commit suicide. Her older brother, Matthew, had a similar response and added that Wanda had embarrassed the family. Wanda’s parents stated that they would attend and urged both Naomi and Matthew to attend family counseling.

(Learning Objective: 1)

  • Wanda’s family must reorganize to survive the disturbance created by the suicide attempt. Describe the family as a system adapting to change.

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 16, Psychopharmacology

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objective:

Discuss the therapeutic indication, mechanism of action, recommended dosage, routes of administration, side effects, potential adverse effects, contraindications, and nursing implications for major psychotropic medications.

1. The student was reviewing the medication record for a client diagnosed with major depressive disorder with psychotic features. The client has been on medications for the past 12 years, has exhibited many side effects, and experienced muiple medication changes. On this admission, the client has developed abnormal movements of the tongue, a masklike face, shuffling gait, and constipation. The client is taking a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and an antipsychotic.

(Learning Objective: 6)

a. Identify the medication classification that may be responsible for the side effects and explain your choice.

b. Discuss the most important nursing implication related to the side effects the client is experiencing.

c. Explain why psychiatric clients experience muiple side effects and often need medication changes.

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 17, Integrative Therapies

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objective:

Construct a list of complementary and aernative therapies used to treat specific psychiatric–mental heah conditions.

  • Marjorie Alin has been diagnosed with major depression and has recently been placed on antidepressants. Marjorie uses herbal medication and has always been interested in complementary and aernative medicine (CAM). She asks the nurse practitioner what CAM therapies might be effective for depression.

(Learning Objective: 4)

a. Develop an educational handout for Ms. Alin listing the CAM therapies that might be helpful with the treatment of depression and providing a description of how the therapy might be beneficial.

b. What CAM therapy might be harmful for an individual with depression being treated with antidepressants? Why?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 18, Somatic Therapies

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Identify the nurse’s role in caring for people undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and their families.

Describe the procedure for ECT, its indications, and its potential side effects.

1. Julie Abrams, a married 45-year-old African American client, is admitted to the hospital for severe depression. Ahough Julie is taking her antidepressant medication, she seldom leaves her bed, sleeps most of the time, and has refused to eat for 6 days. Her psychiatrist has decided that ECT treatments are necessary to improve Julie’s depression. Mr. Abrams, Julie’s husband, is alarmed to learn that Julie will receive ECT. The psychiatric nurse practitioner explains the ECT procedure and treatment that Julie will receive. Mr. Abrams asked the nurse practitioner what ECT is, how it will help Julie, and if there will be any harmful effects for her.

(Learning Objectives: 2, 3)

a. What information will you provide to Mr. Abrams concerning ECT, how it works, and any adverse effects?

b. Prioritize the nursing care responsibilities for Julie.

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 19, Inpatient Care Settings

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Define the various levels of care within inpatient treatment settings.

Explain elements and methods of fostering a therapeutic milieu.

1. Robert Woods has been admitted to an inpatient psychiatric facility due to a resurgence of his manic symptoms because he has not been taking his psychiatric medications. His sister has been trying to supervise Robert, who lives in a small apartment a few miles away. The sister is very frustrated and feels she cannot continue to monitor Robert successfully any longer. She asks what kinds of inpatient care options are available to assist in caring for Robert and voices concern about Robert’s noncompliance with his psychiatric medications.

(Learning Objectives: 1, 4)

a. Review the levels of inpatient care and offer some suggestions to Robert’s sister concerning ongoing psychiatric care.

b. The nurse is responsible for medication administration for Robert. How can a therapeutic environment and strategies assist the nurse in ensuring that Robert takes his psychiatric medications?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 20, Community and Home Psychiatric Care

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Identify the levels of prevention of mental illness.

Describe potential interventions for primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of mental heah problems.

1. Jim is a 10-year-old student in elementary school. The teacher is concerned that Jim may need psychological counseling and possibly psychiatric care since the recent suicide of his father. Jim had formerly been an outgoing child who had excellence performance in schoolwork. Jim is now withdrawn, does not socialize, and is doing poor work in school. Jim’s mother has not responded to a call from the teacher to come to school for a conference to explore ways to help Jim. The teacher consus the school nurse for assistance.

(Learning Objectives: 1, 2)

  • Identify how the school nurse can help Jim and his family in the prevention of mental illness. Discuss each level of prevention in your answer.

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 21, Forensic Psychiatric Nursing

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Describe the nurse’s role in the forensic milieu.

Describe characteristics of psychiatric and mental heah concerns specific to forensic populations, addressing implications for nursing care.

1. Two student nurses are assigned to the forensic unit for their psychiatric learning experiences. They are both slightly apprehensive but want to learn from the nursing staff the role of the nurse in forensic psychiatric nursing.

(Learning Objectives: 1, 2)

a. What will the nurse manager tell the students about the role of the nurse in forensic psychiatric nursing?

b. In addition, what do the student nurses know about the difference between the traditional mental heah setting and the forensic milieu?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 22, Sleep Disorders

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Explain normal changes in sleep across the human lifespan.

1. James, a 12-year-old middle-school student, is having problems with his schoolwork. James cannot sleep until late at night and has been unable to arrive at school until later in the morning due to excessive morning sleepiness and difficuy awakening. James is concerned and depressed over this considerable insomnia with subsequent tardiness in arriving at school. The teacher referred James to the school psychologist, who recommended psychological testing to determine if James has a learning disability. The resus of the test show that James does have a learning disability and needs special placement for his English class. James continues to have insomnia. The pediatrician recommended that James have a study at a sleep clinic. After the test, James was given a sleep schedule and was able to return to his normal sleep schedule. His schoolwork improved after he was able to achieve adequate sleep.

(Learning Objectives: 1)

a. Why did James’ sleep schedule change from his normal routine? Revised Question: What factors could have contributed to the aerations in James’ sleep pattern and subsequent insomnia?

b. How do sleep patterns change for people over the lifespan?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 23, Anxiety Disorders

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Explain what is meant by anxiety disorder.

Identify symptoms of anxiety disorders.

1. Amy is a 33-year-old housewife who has been saying that she is worried but cannot explain why she feels worried. Amy and her husband have two children, and the family members are heahy and financially secure and have no identified problems. Amy has resigned from her volunteer position at her children’s school, stating that she is tired. Amy always had great pride in keeping an immaculate home and preparing nutritional meals for her family. For the past month, she has neglected her housework and seldom cooks meals for her family. For the past 3 weeks, Amy has told her husband that she is afraid that something bad is going to happen to us. Amy is now afraid for her children to leave the home to attend school and for her husband to go to his office to work.

(Learning Objectives: 1, 2)

a. What is an anxiety disorder, and does Amy have this disorder?

b. What other differential diagnoses would you consider? OR What predisposing factors or etiologies are associated with anxiety disorders?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 24, Somatoform, Dissociative, and Sexual Disorders

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Describe possible etiologies of somatoform disorders.

Explain the features of various somatoform disorders.

Identify the most common interdisciplinary goals and treatments for clients with somatoform disorders.

1. Roger is a 60-year-old, twice-divorced, Hispanic man who is retired. His only support system is two adu sons with whom he has a distant relationship. Roger has medical insurance from his retirement and constantly complains that he has some medical problem. He doctor shops by seeing different doctors for his various complaints. Roger is always asking the doctors if he needs surgery. In the past 5 years, he has undergone an exploratory laparotomy for complaints of abdominal pain, three colonoscopies for complaints of aernate diarrhea and constipation, and numerous diagnostic tests for his many physical complaints. All tests and procedures have negative findings for any physical basis. Roger remains convinced that he has muiple problems that the doctors are unable to diagnose.

(Learning Objectives: 1, 3)

a. What are somatoform disorders, and what are the types of this disorder?

b. Based on the information given in the case study, what contributing factors do you believe Roger has? What other factors, not included, could contribute to somatoform disorders? Name the appropriate disciplines involved in the treatment of Roger and the interdisciplinary goals and interventions in treating his somatoform disorder.

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 25, Personality Disorders

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Explain what is meant by personality disorder.

Define personality disorder.

Apply the nursing process to the care of clients with personality disorders.

1. Charles, a 29-year-old white man, has been admitted to the psychiatric hospital. Charles does not seem depressed and openly discusses that he had attempted suicide after he had burned his employer’s office and truck. Charles told the student nurse that he had been mad at his boss because he was a slave driver and shows no remorse for destroying his employer’s office and truck. Charles has limited contact with his mother, who is his only family support. Charles is divorced and states that his ex-wife just got pregnant so that he would marry her. They have one child, and he is several months behind in child support. Other information that Charles gave the student nurse in an interview included that he was an ex-marine but had a dishonorable discharge due to stealing some extra government supplies that he said no one needed. In the treatment team, the psychiatrist stated that Charles was not suicidal and diagnoses him with antisocial personality disorder.

(Learning Objectives: 1, 3)

a. What is an antisocial personality disorder, and what are its symptoms?

b. Applying the nurse process to the treatment of Charles, what specific interventions would be most appropriate for the individual with antisocial personality disorder?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER26, Eating Disorders

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Discuss possible etiologies for eating disorders.

Differentiate anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and binge eating disorder.

1. Anna is a 20-year-old college student who is slightly overweight. Anna is neat and orderly and considered to be a perfectionist. Anna has a sister, Margie, who is 2 years younger and has always been very slim. Anna thinks that she is ugly and that her sister is pretty. Anna began a daily diet of 500 calories with a rigid exercise program to lose weight rapidly. Anna’s weight decreased below the normal amount for her height. Anna continued to diet by reducing her daily caloric intake to 250 calories and then to 100 calories and began to look emaciated. Anna’s parents asked her to increase her food intake, but Anna said that she was still fat and ugly. Anna’s parents intervened by taking her to a psychiatrist for treatment. Anna’s diagnosis was anorexia nervosa.

(Learning Objectives: 1)

a. What is the probable cause of Anna’s eating disorder?

b. What specific eating disorder does Anna most likely have?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 27, Depressive Disorders

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Analyze different theories about the etiology of depressive disorders.

Discuss interdisciplinary treatment modalities for clients with depressive disorders.

  • Sarah, a 37-year-old bank employee, has developed a depressive disorder. Sarah was engaged and planned to be married next month. Her fiancé suddenly broke off their engagement and told Sarah that he had accepted a job in Europe and was moving there immediately. Sarah’s depression began shortly after this and has progressed to the point that she is now seeing a psychiatrist for treatment. Sarah’s family has a history of depressive disorders. Her father has experienced recurrent episodes of depression for 20 years. Sarah’s paternal aunt and great uncle both committed suicide.

(Learning Objectives: 1, 2)

a. Identify and discuss the major theories for the etiology of depressive disorders.

b. What different interdisciplinary treatment modalities would be appropriate to incorporate into the plan of care for Sarah?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 29,

In completing the case study, the student will be addressing the following objectives:

Identify signs and symptoms of schizophrenia.

Explain the subtypes of schizophrenia.

  • Joyce Mns is a 31 years old client whose diagnosis is schizophrenia, disorganized type. Joyce is in the state mental hospital for a long term commitment. The student nurse is escorting Joyce and a group of patients to an art class. Suddenly, Joyce stop and look down at the sidewalk and then says there are many brains down there on the sidewalk later, the student is reviewing the symptoms of schizophrenia for a nursing care plan.

Learning objectives:

a Discuss the symptoms of schizophrenia

b Compare and contrast schizophrenia, disorganized type to other types of schizophrenia.

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 30, Substance Use Disorders

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Identify the two main components of interdisciplinary treatment for clients with substance abuse disorders.

Explain the importance of recognizing co-occurring disorders.

1. John, a 23-year-old unemployed man, is addicted to cocaine. John lives with his mother and sister and has been stealing money from them to pay for his cocaine. His mother persuaded John to voluntarily commit himself to the hospital for treatment of his substance abuse. In the initial assessment interview, the nurse learns that John began smoking marijuana at age 19 and occasionally consumes alcohol. John said that he started on cocaine after his father, who had a history of alcoholism, committed suicide. John says that he began to feel anxious then and still has periods of anxiety. John is cooperative with his treatment program and stated that he wants to get completely off drugs and get a good job to help his mother and sister. John also said that if he experienced anxiety, he would take a stiff drink like his father had done when he was anxious.

(Learning Objectives: 2)

a. How can the psychiatric staff counsel with John to avoid his turning to alcohol as substance?

b. With what other co-occurring disorders could John be diagnosed?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 31, Cognitive Disorders

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Identify clinical features or behaviors associated with cognitive disorders.

Compare possible etiologies of various cognitive disorders, especially Alzheimer’s disease.

1. Will Lunsford is a 78-year-old widower who lives with his daughter. Mr. Lunsford has been increasingly irritable and has lost many personal items during the past few weeks. Today, he returned from a trip around the neighborhood to say that he had lost his truck and could not remember where he parked it. The preceding week, Mr. Lunsford declared that the telephone was broken when he could not remember how to dial the number of his friend. He also asked his daughter when they would have breakfast one morning an hour after they had eaten breakfast. Mr. Lunsford’s daughter made an appointment for him to be seen by his doctor. The doctor diagnosed Mr. Lunsford with Alzheimer’s disease.

(Learning Objectives: 1, 2)

a. What are the clinical features or behaviors associated with cognitive disorders?

b. What possible etiologies can be applied to Mr. Lunsford’s new diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 32, Anger and Aggression

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Discuss various interventions to manage anger and aggression.

Define broad factors that can increase risk for anger, aggression, and violence.

1. Frances, a 49-year-old African American client, is a newly admitted patient to the psychiatric hospital. Frances has the dual diagnoses of Bipolar I and Borderline Personality Disorder. Frances refuses to abide by the unit rules of being out in the day room after breakfast and is staying in her room. Her treatment level permits her to make two telephone calls daily, and Frances is demanding unlimited access to the telephone Frances is becoming increasingly frustrated and angry at the staff and has used some expletives in telling them what she thinks of the unit rules. The primary nurse attempts to defuse Frances’ anger but finally becomes frustrated and angry herself, and she commented to Frances that if she did not cooperate with unit rules, she could expect to be in the hospital longer than usual. Frances then lunged at the nurse, striking her on the head with her fist. Frances was taken to the calming room and given a medication for her aggressive behavior.

(Learning Objectives: 2)

a. What therapeutic communication techniques could the nurse have used with Frances to prevent her from becoming angry and aggressive?

b. What factors could have contributed to an increase in Frances’ level of anger?

Case Study, Mohr

Chapter 33, Violence and Abuse

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Discuss the effects of mareatment on child development.

Describe an organizational model for the muiple conditions that support community violence.

1. Nita’s mother died when she was an infant. Her father married a young woman 1 year after the death of Nita’s mother. A baby girl was born to the stepmother 2 years later, followed by the birth of a baby boy 4 years later. The stepmother showed much preferential treatment to her own children, while she basically ignored Nita except to routinely ridicule her. The most difficu household chores were given to Nita, with no chores given to her own daughter. The stepmother frequently severely punished Nita without reason. Publicly, the stepmother insisted that she treated Nita and her daughter alike in every way. However, she always praised her own daughter, while continuing to verbally abuse Nita. Nita’s father put his wife in full charge and had almost no interaction with Nita. He, too, showed preferential treatment for his two children with his second wife. When Nita was 14 years old, her aunt insisted that Nita move to live with her. The aunt was very nurturing, and Nita’s life improved tremendously. Nita was very intelligent and excelled in school. Nevertheless, she was slow to make close friends and lacked confidence in social situations. Nita became a successful professional as a college professor. Nita appeared afraid to form a close relationship and was 31 years old when she married.

(Learning Objectives: 1) a. Is mareatment of children a problem, and what are the effects on their development and functioning?

b.Discuss the Ecological Model of Violence and how it applies to the case of Nita

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 34, Suicide and Suicidal Behavior

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives: List the warning signs of suicide.

Explain factors contributing to suicidal risk, including the relationship to cuure and ethnicity, age, and gender.

1. Kate, a 35-year-old white woman, who moved to another city to take a new job. Kate has a depressive disorder and has no friends in her new city; her only family support is one brother. Kate has lost her new job and is without insurance or funds to purchase her prescribed antidepressants. Kate formerly had excellent credit but now realizes that since she has no money, she may have to declare bankruptcy. Kate became extremely depressed, purchased a gun, wrote suicide letters to her friends, and decided to commit suicide. Kate then called 911 just before png the trigger on the gun. However, the gun jammed and did not eject bullets. A policeman came to her apartment in response to the 911 call and took Kate to the local psychiatric hospital. After discharge, Kate went to live with her brother. Kate’s brother is concerned that she is a continued suicide risk.

(Learning Objectives: 1)

a. What are the warning signs of suicide?

b. What factors could have contributed to Kate’s desire to commit suicide?.

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 35, Crisis Intervention

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Differentiate maturational, situational, and adventitious crisis.

Apply the nursing process to a client, family, or community in crisis.

1. Frances Gordon is a 42-year-old divorced school teacher. Her 20-year-old daughter, Sarah, has developed schizophrenia and has withdrawn from college. Her youngest daughter, Glenda, is a 19-year-old unmarried mother who is living at home. Glenda has just given birth to a baby boy who has a heart defect. The baby’s father refuses to pay for any of the heahcare costs. Frances’ dire economic situation is very stressful to her. Her ex-husband refuses to help financially, and the bank has refused a second loan to Frances.

(Learning Objectives: 1) a. Can you differentiate between maturational, situational, and adventitious crises? What type of crisis is Frances experiencing?

  • Discuss how to apply the nursing process in the care of Frances.

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 36, Pediatric Clients

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Identify factors that contribute to psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents.

Discuss general interventions available for children or adolescents with psychiatric disorders.

1. Jeremy is a 9-year-old child hospitalized in the children’s unit of a psychiatric hospital. Jeremy’s biological father died 2 years ago, and the mother now has a live-in boyfriend who has repeatedly sexually abused Jeremy. Jeremy’s teacher reported this abuse to the Children’s Protective Services, and Jeremy was removed from the home. Jeremy’s biological mother has experienced a depressive disorder for several years. Since he has been living with his foster parents, Jeremy has exhibited numerous problems of angry outbursts with physical violence toward other children living in his foster home. The foster parents are seeking help from the psychiatrist to continue to care for Jeremy in their home.

(Learning Objectives: 1, 2)

a. Identify some of the factors that contribute to psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents.

b. What interventions would be most appropriate in the treatment of Jeremy?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 37, Older Adu Clients

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives: Differentiate communication approaches when working with older adus.

Discuss attitudes that many in society hold toward older people.

1. Molly Brewster is a 79-year-old white widow who is admitted to the hospital for diagnostic studies. Mrs. Brewster has been feeling fatigued with slight depression that has been increasing for the past 2 weeks prior to admission. The student nurse is assigned to care for Molly and explain some of the preparation for the diagnostic studies.

(Learning Objectives: 1)

a. What are some effective communication techniques that the student nurse should use in therapeutic communication with Mrs. Brewster?

b. Discuss different societal attitudes that individuals may have in reaction to someone in Mrs. Brewster’s position.

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 38, Homeless Clients

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Discuss factors that contribute to homelessness in people with mental illness.

Discuss barriers that prevent homeless people with mental illness from receiving care measures to promote access.

  • Kevin, a 39-year-old unemployed homeless male who has paranoid schizophrenia, was brought to the psychiatric hospital by the police. Citizens called the police because Kevin was in the street directing pedestrians and traffic in opposition to the traffic lights and verbally abusing everyone who did not follow his directions. Kevin is known to the police since he is often homeless, and states that his family does not want him. Kevin also has a history of poly substance abuse with alcohol, heroin, and crack cocaine, and he has been jailed for public intoxication several times. The nursing assessment reveals that Kevin has not been taking his prescribed psychotropic medications for 3 weeks. Kevin states that he does not have any money, and he does not remember where to go for mental heah care (Learning Objectives: 2)

a. What are the major factors that contribute to Kevin’s frequent homelessness?

b. What barriers does Kevin face in the receiving treatment? How can these barriers be addressed?

Case Study, Mohr

CHAPTER 39, Clients with Medical Illnesses

In completing the case study, students will be addressing the following learning objectives:

Identify common medical conditions that can have accompanying psychiatric complications or symptoms. Describe general nursing implications for clients experiencing psychiatric disorders that are intertwined with other nonpsychiatric illnesses.

1. Carla, a 27-year-old white single mother of two preschool-age children, is in the psychiatric hospital for treatment of anxiety and depression. Carla has a cardiac condition that requires surgery. Carla is concerned over the financial cost of the surgery and caretakers for her children while she is in the hospital and undergoing rehabilitation. Carla is also worried that she may be unable to continue in her present employment as a salesperson due to the physical demands of this position. Carla’s case is representative of many patients with medical conditions who develop psychiatric symptoms.

(Learning Objectives: 1, 2)

a. What are some prevalent medical conditions that can also be accompanied by psychiatric symptoms or complications?

b.What are some nursing implications for Carla that address both the psychiatric and nonpsychiatric illnesses?

No. It is indeed difficu for Michael to accept the doctors opinion since before he fell sick, he had
information from the pastor on depression on which he solely believed and now he is a living…
Social Science

1 A small Caribbean island relies heavily on tourist income

There is a need to develop a study so that an

Question

1. A small Caribbean island relies heavily on tourist income. There is a need to develop a study so that an

estimate can be provided each month as to:

The number of tourists

The length of stay

Their activities

Their attitudes toward some programs and activities.

The plan is to conduct short interviews with respondents and to leave with them a short questionnaire to be completed and mailed after returning home.

Several sampling plans are being considered. One is to generate a random sample of hotel rooms and to interview each occupant. Another involves sampling every nth person that passes a predetermined point in the city. Still another is to sample departing planes and ships. About six planes and three ships depart each day. Design a sampling plan so that each month 500 tourists are obtained in the sample. Identify sources of sampling frame error for each one.

2.

The manager of the appliance dept. of a local full-line department store chain is planning a major nonprice promotion of food processors, supported by heavy advertising in the two local newspapers. The manager asks you to recommend a method of sampling customers in the department store. The purpose is to assess the extent to which customers were drawn by the special advertisement and the extent to which the advertisement influenced their intentions to buy. A pretest of the questionnaire indicates that it will take about 3 minutes to administer. The manager is especially interested in learning whether there are significant differences in the response to the questionnaire among (a) males versus females, (b) gift buyers versus other buyers, and (c) age groups.

Statistics and Probability

Question When you’re done reading compose a discussion post that addresses the

Question

Question:When you’re done reading, compose a discussion post that addresses the

following:

  1. Who is at fau for plagiarizing, and why? How could P l a g i a r i s m have been avoided?

  1. Why do students pagiarize?

  1. How will you ensure that you will not inadvertently P l a g i a r i z e while engaged in your studies at UoPeople? Be sure to discuss at least two strategies you will use to prevent P l a g i a r i s m in your work and to address the importance of A P A citation and references.

Your response should be at least 250Words.

PROFESSOR LOVELIT

CASE STUDY – COLLEGE PAPER

REGGIE was really upset. He hadn’t started the paper. In fact he had only read about 25pages out of the 300 he needed to read before beginning the paper. Making matters worse, he had missed class discussions because of games. The first thing Reggie did was call
Writing

Can someone help me with this C++ programming homework? I don’t have time to finish it myself this week I’ve

Question

Can someone help me with this C++ programming homework? I don’t have time to finish it myself this week. I’ve

attached the instructions, a template, as well as some sample outputs. Thank you!

Enter number of students: 2
Enter the three exams score for student #1: 12 34 56
Enter the three exams score for student #2: 99 B? 3? Student Scnrel Scere2 Scere3 Total 1 12 34 12 192 –
2 99 a? 99…
Engineering Technology

Q is reacted in the manner shown below to form X (Molecular formula C7H14O) The IR and1H NMR spectrum

Question

Q is reacted in the manner shown below to form X (Molecular formula: C7H14O). The IR and

1H NMR spectrum

of X is provided below. What is the structure of Q? (4 points)

IR of X

A.

B.

C.

D.

E.

Q

1) Sia2BH/THF

2) H2O2, NaOH

X

(Molecular formula: C7H14O)

Chemistry 307 Exam II June 27, 2016 Student Name (Print):________________________
Student Signature:__________________________
ID #:______________________
Section Number:____________
Recitation…
Science

1) The experimentally reintroduced grey wolf population of Idaho was 310 at the beginning of 2004 During the

Question

1) The experimentally re-introduced grey wolf population of Idaho was 310 at the beginning of 2004. During the

year, 112 pups were born and 49 individuals died or were removed from the study area. Calculate the per capita growth rate of this grey wolf population during the study period

2) Six one-drop samples in a Paramecium sp. population had the following numbers of organisms: 4, 6, 5, 3, 6, and 6. If 20 drops represent 1 mL of solution, and the volume of the solution is 40 mL, calculate the size of the population.

3) A population of rattlesnakes contains 1000 individuals. During the year, there are 106 births, 53 deaths, 42 immigrations, and 15 emigrations. Calculate the per capita growth rate for the year.

Science

Health Economics

You could write in bullet points in two pages long.

Read the

Question

Heah Economics: You could write in bullet points in two pages long.

Read the

following attachment, Come up with 2 questions, and Answer the following questions(5 questions):

1) A. What is the question asked in the paper? B. What is the contribution to the existing literature?

2) What is a randomized trial? Describe the main features of the randomization used in the study.

3) What are the econometric specifications used in the paper (refer to equations 1, 2, 3 and 4)?

4) Summarize the main resus of the study.

5) Describe the issues related to scaling up the intervention.

Surname 1 Name:
Instructor’s name:
Course:
Date:
Title: Surname 2 Demand for Medical Male Circumcision. Research has doubtlessly proven that male circumcision reduces up to 60% the likelihood
of…
Economics

Respond in essay form to the following It has to be 100% free plagiarized Please include reference at least two

Question

Respond in essay form to the following. It has to be 100% free plagiarized. Please include reference, at least two

pages.

Describe Sufism. How was Sufism initially thought of, and how did attitudes change? How did AL-Ghazali change the perception of Sufism? About the three Sufi and tell how each exemplifies the Sufi spirit.

The matter of Sufism is the Fact and the significance of Sufism is the caring encountering and
realization of the Truth. The act of Sufism is the expectation to go towards the Truth, by method
for…
Religious Studies

Hello Tutors My assignment is to prepare a CPA examination study sheet These include all 4

Question

Hello Tutors,

My assignment is to prepare a CPA examination study sheet. These include all 4

sections; FAR, BEC, REG, AUD. It should be 10 pages for each section (meaning a 40 page total with single spacing). This should contain problems with solutions that are relevant to the most recent iteration of the CPA examination. Please feel free to reach out if you have any further questions.

Thank You In Advance For Your Time!

CPA STUDY QUIDE AUD EXAM OVERVIEW
Introduction
What is the objective of auditing According to the International Standard on Auditing (ISA) No.
200?
Answer
To enable the auditor to express an…
Business

The experiment is performed using a Petri dish 10 0 cm diameter halffilled with water and a solution of stearic

Question

The experiment is performed using a Petri dish 10.0 cm diameter, half-filled with water, and a solution of stearic

acid in hexanes of concentration 0.140 g/L. The student calculated that the stearic acid molecule has a surface area of 0.210 nm^2.

Using the molecular formula of stearic acid and the accepted value of avogrado’s number, calculate the volume of stearic acid solution (in uL) that the student added to form the monolayer.

hint: make sure you have the correct number of significant figures, and that you correctly convert between nm^2 and cm^2, and that constant are not considered when deciding on your sig.fig.

Science

American anthropology has long focused on race as a very powerful and real form of difference and

Question

American anthropology has long focused on race as a very powerful and real form of difference and

discrimination and yet as one that invites new forms of analysis. What was the approach of Boas to race and the use of anthropometry in late 19th century physical anthropology, both through anthropometric studies of U.S. migrants and through the development of the concept of cuure? How does the anthropologist’s own ethnic, racial, or national identity become relevant, explicitly or not, to their method and analysis? (Earlier in the course we discussed this in relation to Mead versus Hurston, and to the work of Kirin Narayan, and we might ask the same question of the authors we engaged at the end of the course, and in particular to Ralph, Hochschild, Catellino, and Shankar.) With the emergence of very public media (mobile phone videos of police killings of African Americans, and gang killings of African Americans, for example, or of shared narratives of having other people cut in line, or of advertising), how do scholars continue to rethink what race is and does, and how forms of inequality are experienced? Many authors in this course and certainly the scholars we discussed in the last three weeks, may be helpful to compare.

Running Head: AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGY American anthropology
Student Name
Course Title
Professor Name
University Name
5 May, 2017 1 AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGY
2 American anthropology
The approach of Boas…
Social Science

How has this study failed to rule out rival hypotheses?Sometimes we bump into people we ‘know we know’

Question

How has this study failed to rule out rival hypotheses?

Sometimes we bump into people we ‘know we know’,

but just can’t place them. This also means that we likely do not remember their name. How embarrassing!! Scientists have questioned whether this is a specific issue with face recognition. Many studies have been carried out to examine whether single cells within the brain or a network of neurons are responsible for face recognition. Further, much research has been conducted to reveal that face recognition depends on the temporal lobe. This makes sense as the temporal lobe is the lobe of the brain important for memory. If this particular area of the brain is damaged, a person can develop prosopagnosia, or the inability to recognize faces. In these individuals, it appears that reading and hence, vision is not the issue, and recognizing voices is intact, so memory is also not the problem. However, the latest research in the Journal of Psychiatry and Psychological Medicinesuggests that whether one recognizes someone is all in your head (not that one is crazy or anything, but that various mechanisms and a conundrum of pathways and neurotoxins are at work), and that emotion plays a role too!

Researchers from Cambridge University, Mappin and Glen, conducted a thorough study in 2016 that showed that recognizing a face is related to facial expressions and that we tend to recognize people more when they present to us as happy and smiling, as such a presentation encourages social interaction. These researchers conducted a follow-up, neuroimaging study too and demonstrated that increased attention and focus on a face enhances and encourages habituation and stronger reaction to different-emotion faces.

The study recruited 30 heahy people from a local, popular coffee shop, who all reported sitting in the café every day to ‘people watch.’ Due to the nature of the study, these people saw more faces in a day than most people living in that local community.

The experimenters approached and then asked the participants to indicate whether people walking through the café door appeared happy, sad, fearful, or angry. Based on how these people chose, they then took a smaller sample of participants, to identify some pictures of famous, recognizable people. The researchers focused in fact on those that thought they saw happy faces walk into the café, to identify the famous pictures shown. They thought that if the participant identified that emotion, that they would be more likely to identify and associate that emotion with the pictures viewed, i.e., a famous person showing positive expression. The resus confirmed their prediction – more famous people were identified by participants who saw people as ‘happy.’

The researchers had also decided that they wanted saliva samples from participants to code hormone levels to better validate the mood the participant was in while completing the study. All participants were offered and drank coffee while looking at the pictures. Once participants left, the mugs were bagged and taken to the lab for testing.

Overall, it seems like happy facial expressions can lead to better identification of faces!

Social Science

? To precipitate their Group C cation Ca Ba

Question

,

? – To precipitate their Group C cation- Ca, Ba,

Sr a fellow student adds 1M (NH4)2SO4 and no precipitate forms. The student then

adds saturated ammonium oxalate and a white precipitate forms. What is the most likely identity of the Group C cation?

What would you instruct the student to do to confirm the identity? Specific instructions along with observations are needed.

Background info:

Background Chemistry and Discussion

After removing the Group A and Group B cations from your unknown by precipitation, the Group C and D cations remain in

solution. The three ions; Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+, that make up Group C have soluble chlorides and hydroxides that are reasonably

soluble in ammonia solutions. These three ions can be separated from the Group D ions by selective precipitation.

Identification of your Group C cation based solely upon the color of the precipitate formed is not possible since the

precipitates formed by Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ do not have colors unique from each other. Identification can be achieved by using

a combination of solubility behavior and flame tests. You are required to develop a scheme that will allow you to separate

and correctly identify the Group C cation present in your unknown solution.

Science

For english i needed to read a passage and answer a few questions thank you! passage BULLYING IN

Question

for english i needed to read a passage and answer a few questions thank you!.

passage:

BULLYING IN

EARLY ADOLESCENCE

The Role of the Peer Group

by Dorothy L. Espelage

2002

FONT SIZEAAAA

This informational text explores various research studies about adolescents bullying their peers, with a focus on how peer groups play a role.

As you read, take notes on the evidence each of the scientific studies provides about how bullying occurs.

Untitled by Elijah Henderson is licensed under CC0.

[1]A recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association demonstrated the seriousness of bullying in American schools. In a nationally representative sample of over 15,686 students in the United States (grades 6 through 10), 29.9% self-reported frequent involvement in bullying at school, with 13% participating as a bully, 10.9% as a victim, and 6% as both (Nansel et al., 2001). Aggression and violence during childhood and adolescence have been the focus of much research over the past several decades (e.g., Loeber Hay, 1997; Olweus, 1979). These researchers have found that serious forms of aggression remain relatively stable from childhood through aduhood; however, Loeber and Hay (1997) argue that mild forms of aggression may not begin for some children until early or late adolescence. Despite Loeber and Hay’s findings, very little research has been conducted on mild forms of aggression, such as bullying, during the middle years. One notable gap in the evolving literature on bullying and victimization1 during early adolescence is the role that peers play in promoting bullying and victimization by either reinforcing the aggressor, failing to intervene to stop the victimization, or affiliating2 with students who bully. This Digest looks at the limited research available on the role of the peer group in bullying to learn more about how bullying and victimization might emerge or continue during early adolescence.

DEFINITIONS OF BULLYING

While definitions of bullying often differ semantically, many of them have one concept in common: Bullying is a subtype of aggression (Dodge, 1991; Olweus, 1993; Smith Thompson, 1991). The following definitions are common in the literature: A person is being bed when he or she is exposed, repeatedly over time, to negative actions on the part of one or more other students (Olweus, 1993, p. 9). A student is being bed or picked on when another student says nasty and unpleasant things to him or her. It is also bullying when a student is hit, kicked, threatened, locked inside a room, sent nasty notes, and when no one ever talks to him (Smith Sharp, 1994, p. 1).

PEER ACCEPTANCE AND STATUS

During early adolescence, the function and importance of the peer group can change dramatically (Crockett, Losoff, Petersen, 1984; Dornbusch, 1989). Adolescents, seeking autonomy3 from their parents, turn to their peers to discuss problems, feelings, fears, and doubts, thereby increasing the salience4 of time spent with friends (Sebald, 1992; Youniss Smollar, 1985). However, this reliance on peers for social support is coupled with increasing pressures to attain social status (Corsaro Eder, 1990; Eder, 1985). It is during adolescence that peer groups become stratified5 and issues of acceptance and popularity become increasingly important. Research indicates, for example, that toughness and aggressiveness are important status considerations for boys, while appearance is a central determinant6 of social status among girls (Eder, 1995). Some researchers believe that the pressure to gain peer acceptance and status may be related to an increase in teasing and bullying. This behavior may be intended to demonstrate superiority over other students for boys and girls, either through name-calling or ridiculing.

SETTING THE STAGE FOR BULLYING IN MIDDLE SCHOOL

Research with elementary school children in other countries supports the view that peer group members reinforce and maintain bullying (e.g., Craig Pepler, 1997; Salmivalli et al., 1996). These authors contend that bullying can best be understood from a social-interactional perspective (i.e., bullying behaviors are considered a resu of a complex interaction between individual characteristics, such as impulsivity,7 and the social context, including the peer group and school social system). Participation of peers in the bullying process was clearly evident when Pepler and her colleagues videotaped aggressive and socially competent8 Canadian children in grades 1 through 6 on the playground; peers were involved in bullying in an astounding 85% of bully episodes (Craig Pepler, 1997). Similarly, in a survey study of sixth-graders in Finland, the majority of students participated in the bullying process in some capacity, and their various participant roles were significantly related to social status within their respective classrooms (Salmivalli et al., 1996). Clearly, peers play an instrumental role in bullying and victimization on elementary school playgrounds and within classrooms.

TRANSITION TO MIDDLE SCHOOL AND FITTING IN

[5]Less well understood are the peer dynamics9 associated with bullying during the transition from elementary school to middle school. Some researchers speculate that this transition can cause stress that might promote bullying behavior, as students attempt to define their place in the new social structure. For example, changing from one school to another often leads to an increase in emotional and academic difficuies (Rudolph et al., 2001); bullying may be another way that young people deal with the stress of a new environment.

A short-term investigation of over 500 middle school students (grades 6-8) found an increase in bullying behavior among sixth-graders over a 4-month period (Espelage, Bosworth, Simon, 2001). The authors speculated that the sixth-graders were assimilating10 into the middle school, where bullying behavior was part of the school cuure. This speculation is supported by the theory that bullying is a learned behavior, and that as they enter middle school, sixth-graders have not yet learned how to interact positively in the social milieu11 of the school. Many sixth-graders who wish to fit in may adopt the behaviors — including teasing — of those students who have been in the school longer and who have more power to dictate the social norm.

Two recent studies further examined the hypothesis that middle school students opt to bully their peers to fit in (Pellegrini, Bartini, Brooks, 1999; Rodkin et al., 2000). Pellegrini and colleagues found that bullying enhanced within-group status and popularity among 138 fifth-graders making the transition through the first year of middle school. Similarly, Rodkin and colleagues, in a study of 452 fourth- through sixth-grade boys, found 13.1% were rated as both aggressive and popular by their teachers. Furthermore, these aggressive popular boys and popular prosocial boys received an equivalent number of cool ratings from peers.

These two studies do not examine how the influence of the peer group on bullying behaviors differs across sex, grade, or level of peer group status. A study by Espelage and Ho (2001) of 422 middle school students (grades 6-8), using a survey that included demographic questions, self-report, and peer-report measures of bullying and victimization, and measures of other psychosocial12 variables, examined the association between popularity and bullying behavior. Despite the finding that bes as a group enjoyed a strong friendship network, the relationship between bullying and popularity differed for males and females, and also differed across grades. The most striking finding was the strong correlation13 between bullying and popularity among sixth-grade males, which dropped considerably for seventh-grade males and was not associated for eighth-grade males. Closer examination of peer cliques in this sample found that students not only hung out with peers who bully at similar rates but that students also reported an increase in bullying over a school year if their primary peer group bed others (Espelage, Ho, Henkel, in press).

CONCLUSION

We cannot assume that bullying among young adolescents is a simple interaction between a bully and a victim. Instead, recent studies and media reports suggest that there are groups of students who support their peers and sometimes participate in teasing and harassing other students. It seems important for families, schools, and other community institutions to help children and young adolescents learn how to manage, and potentially change, the pressure to hurt their classmates in order to fit in.

question 1.

PART A: Which of the following best identifies a central idea of this text?

  1. A Bullying occurs as a simple interaction between a bully and the bully’s victim.
  2. B Bullying harms the victim in various ways but the bully is harmed as well.
  3. C Groups of students who support bullying contribute to its development.
  4. D Bes are insecure because they are failing to adapt to a new environment.

question 2.

PART B: Which quote from the text best supports the answer to Part A?

  1. A One notable gap in the evolving literature on bullying and victimization during early adolescence is the role that peers play in promoting bullying and victimization by either reinforcing the aggressor, failing to intervene to stop the victimization, or affiliating with students who bully. ( Paragraph 1)
  2. B Research indicates, for example, that toughness and aggressiveness are important status considerations for boys, while appearance is a central determinant of social status among girls (Eder, 1995). ( Paragraph 3)
  3. C For example, changing from one school to another often leads to an increase in emotional and academic difficuies (Rudolph et al., 2001); bullying may be another way that young people deal with the stress of a new environment. ( Paragraph 5)
  4. D Instead, recent studies and media reports suggest that there are groups of students who support their peers and sometimes participate in teasing and harassing other students. ( Paragraph 9)

question 3.

Which statement best identifies how the text describes the relationship between bullying and middle school?

  1. A Bullying only begins to emerge in sixth grade and becomes strongest in eighth grade for boys and girls.
  2. B Participation in bullying may be part of the process of adapting to the cuure of middle school and changes by age and gender through eighth grade.
  3. C The most serious form of bullying is common throughout middle school and remains a means to seek popularity through eighth grade.
  4. D Bullying is common throughout middle school but does not become a means to seek popularity until eighth grade.

question 4.

What does the Peer Acceptance and Status section contribute to the author’s description of adolescents in the text?

  1. A It positions teenagers as cruel, unfair, and very likely to become bes.
  2. B It highlights that teenagers begin to rely more on their peers for support.
  3. C It reveals how teenagers lose superiority over others when they bully.
  4. D It explains how bullying leads to increased social status for teenagers.

question 5.

How is paragraph 8 effective in supporting the development of ideas in this text? quote and explain

this is a really important grade for me because each question is graded. thank you i appreciate your help!

English Literature

Describe a person that has high levels of media dependency Tell me about their media usage (give me their viewing

Question

Describe a person that has high levels of media dependency. Tell me about their media usage (give me their viewing

behavior). Explain what factors have caused this dependency.

Running head: MEDIA DEPENDENCY 1 Media Dependency
Student’s Name
Course Title
NOV 07, 2016 MEDIA DEPENDENCY 2
MEDIA DEPENDENCY Dependency theory was originally proposed by Sandra Ball-Rokeach and…
Communications

My topic is managing a diverse workforce This is dealing with the ethical legal and business practice issues

Question

My topic is managing a diverse workforce. This is dealing with the ethical, legal and business practice issues

facing women and minorities at work and owning their own businesses, along with the gender and racial pay gap. The attached documents are essential in the completion of this Critical Analysis Template. 1 Running head: EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Equal Employment Opportunities
Student’s Name
Student 2 EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Critical Analysis Topic: managing a diverse workforce…

Writing

1An example of an individual financial COI is A researcher’s wife works at the same university as the

Question

1-An example of an individual financial COI is:

A researcher’s wife works at the same university as the

researcher.

A researcher’s 10-year-old son wins a local science competition, the prize for which is a $5,000 scholarship to a workshop sponsored by a local company that sponsors one of the researcher’s ongoing projects.

A researcher’s wife holds equity in a publicly traded pharmaceutical company that is also the sponsor of the researcher’s study.

A researcher is considering buying stock in a publicly traded company that specializes in making and delivering hand tossed pizza.

2-The COI management plan aims to:

Provide procedures or extras steps to be taken to minimize the risk of bias when a COI is disclosed

Eliminate all COIs in research when a COI is disclosed

Address disclosure of COIs in mui-center research when a COI is disclosed

Reduce IRB review burden when a COI is disclosed

3-During an Institutional Review Board (IRB) meeting, any IRB member who may have a potential COI with a study under review should:

Leave the meeting immediately

Disclose their potential COI and not participate in any action

Disclose their potential COI and may answer questions, but recuse themselves from voting

Disclose their potential COI, but not answer any questions about the study

Management

65 Men and 45 women are enrolled in calculus There are 30 business majors 40 biology majors 25 computer science

Question

65 men and 45 women are enrolled in calculus. There are 30 business majors, 40 biology majors, 25 computer science

majors, and 15 mathematics majors. No person has a double major. If a single calculus student is chosen, find the following probabilities.

Find the probability that the student is male.

P(male)=

Find the probability that the student is a computer science major.

P(computer science)=

Find the probability that the student is not a biology major.

P(not biology)=

Math

There are TEN short essays questions

Your answers should consist of a minimum of TWO full paragraphs (7-9

Question

There are TEN short essays questions. Your answers should consist of a minimum of TWO full paragraphs (7-9

sentences, or more) minimum. You are welcome to answer at more length if you so choose.

1. Discuss the rise and history of Anthropology in North America.

2. Why is it important to study nonhuman primates? What do studies of nonhuman primates suggest about the behavior of humans, past and present?

3. Explain the difference in the approaches of science and religion (myth), discussing the nature of scientific inquiry (methods, hypotheses).

4. Describe generally Darwin’s observations and inferences leading to his idea of evolution (see additional notes).

5. Discuss the methods, concepts, and dating techniques of paleoanthropology.

6. The genus Australopithecus is classified as a bipedal hominid. What is the evidence and why do

we think it is bipedal? Include a discussion on bipedal adaptation.

7. Cite the evidence for Homo erectus as a nomadic species and describe the biological and cuural

significance of this group. How do they differ from earlier and later hominid species?

8. Discuss the place of the Neanderthals in human evolution. Include aspects of their cuure,

morphology, and the issue of recent human prejudice (perhaps) of seeing a European ancestor that is

so rough in build. Where do the Neanderthals fit in?

9. How is do we practice archaeology and what is meant by the archaeological record?

10. Identify and discuss the major cuural features of the Lower, Middle, and Upper Palaeolithc.

When is it that our humanity began?

Running head: SHORT ESSAYS ANSWERS Short Essay Answers
Student’s Name
Institution Affiliation
Course
Date of Submission 1 SHORT ESSAYS ANSWERS 2 Question One
Anthropology emerged as a relevant…
Social Science

You can use my book on Chegg comTASK Lesson Journal 3

Question

4. Explain the central problem of humanity understood by Buddhists and why that problem keeps us bound to a boundless cycle of life.

Running Head: HINDUISM 1 Religion:
Name:
Institution: HINDUISM 2 Lesson 6 (Chapter 4-Hinduism):
1. Hinduism is one of the world’s oldest religions associated with the people of India. It is a…
Religious Studies

Looking for answer to the following Cultural Anthropology questions Must be a 23 complete sentences

Question

Looking for answer to the following Cuural Anthropology questions. Must be a 2-3 complete sentences

reply to each and include references for each reply.

What is the function or purpose of kinship systems, particularly descent groups and terminology naming practices? Why is the study of kinship in general so important to the study of anthropology (what is the relationship?)

What is the difference between sex and gender from an anthropological perspective? How are men’s and women’s gender roles within the USA created and maintained?

What aspects does anthropologists look at when they study political systems? Be sure to briefly describe the types of societies, as well as the role of power and social control.

How do religion or belief systems function in society? Also briefly discuss the two categories of type of belief and the types of ritual ceremonies.

Why is art created? Give five examples of human creative expression, including one form that you personally practice or enjoy.

US History

ITMG381 Cyberlaw 300 Words and APAFormatText Ferrera

Reder, Bird, Darrow,Aresty, Klosek

Question

ITMG381 Cyberlaw: 300 Words and APAFormat

Text: Ferrera, Reder, Bird, Darrow,Aresty, Klosek

Lichtenstein
Special Topics Collection: Cyberlaw – Text and Cases

Readthe case study on pp. 387-392 of the textbook and answer the followingquestions:

1. The trial court found that Stengart didnot have a legitimate expectation of privacy when sending personal emailsthrough the company’s laptop. The appellate court and the Supreme Courtdisagreed. Discuss the reasoning that the higher courts had in reversing thetrial court.

2. What effect would this decision have on acompany when thinking about forming company policy regarding personalcommunication?

Read the case study on pp. 417-419 ofthe textbook and answer the following questions:

3. Would a state antispam statute thatspecifically prohibited pornographic, obscene, terroristic, and fraudulentemailing withstand constitutional scrutiny? Why or why not?

4. Is spam really so bad? Why can a businesslawfully send unsolicited traditional mail, or make unsolicited phonecalls (as long as there is no violation of a no-call list) but spammingviolates the law?

Surname 1 Name
Instructor
Course
Date
Cyber laws
1. The trial court found that Stengart did not have a legitimate expectation of privacy
when sending personal emails through the company’s laptop….
Management

The Hydrogen Atom – Student GuideBackground MaterialCarefully read the background pages entitled

Question

The Hydrogen Atom – Student Guide
Background Material
Carefully read the background pages entitled

Energy Levels, Light, and Transitions and answer the following questions to check your understanding. (on attached documents)

Name: The Hydrogen Atom – Student Guide Background Material
Carefully read the background pages entitled Energy Levels, Light, and Transitions and
answer the following questions to check your…
Science

2014 AP Biology

Exam FRQ.

I have 3 free response questions from the 2014 AP Bio exam. The questions
and

Question

2014 AP Biology Exam FRQ.

I have 3 free response questions from the 2014 AP Bio exam. The questions and

requirements are in the pdf document, it also contain grading guidelines and answers, and student’s sample answer.

I really need help to put it in my own words and thoughts and not just copy the student sample answer.
See ap14_biology_q1.pdfAP® BIOLOGY
2014 SCORING GUIDELINES
Question 1
Trichomes are hairlike outgrowths of the epidermis of plants that are thought to provide protection against
being eaten by herbivores (herbivory). In a certain plant species, stem trichome density is genetically
determined.
To investigate variation in stem trichome density within the plant species, a student counted the number
of trichomes on the stems of six plants in each of three different populations. The student used the data to
calculate the mean trichome density (numbers of hairs per square centimeter) for each population. The
resus are provided in the table below.
TRICHOME DENSITY IN THREE PLANT POPULATIONS (number of trichomes/cm2)
Population Plant 1 Plant 2 Plant 3 Plant 4 Plant 5 Plant 6 Sample
Mean Standard
Error of the
Mean (SEM)
1 I 8 11 9 10 8 6 9 II 12 6 15 9 13 8 11 1 III 13 17 9 14 12 16 14 1 (a) On the axes provided, create an appropriately labeled graph to illustrate the sample means of the three
populations to within 95 percent confidence (i.e., sample mean ± 2 SEM). (3 points maximum; LO 1.1)
• Correctly labeled, scaled, with proper units
• Bar graph or modified bar graph with appropriately plotted means
• 2x standard error (SEM) above and below means
(b) Based on the sample means and standard errors of the means, identify the two populations that are
most likely to have statistically significant differences in the mean stem trichome densities. Justify
your response. (2 points maximum; LO 4.11, 4.19)
Identification (1 point)
• Populations I and III
Justification (1 point)
• The error bars/95 percent confidence intervals for populations I and III do not overlap
• (Sample mean + 2 SEM of population I) ; (Sample mean − 2 SEM of population III) © 2014 The College Board.
Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.org. AP® BIOLOGY
2014 SCORING GUIDELINES
Question 1 (continued)
(c) Describe the independent and dependent variables and a control treatment for an experiment to test
the hypothesis that higher trichome density in plants is selected for in the presence of herbivores. Also
identify an appropriate duration of the experiment to ensure that natural selection is measured and
predict the experimental resus that would support the hypothesis. (5 points maximum; LO 1.5, 1.11)
NOTE: Points are earned in a single row only.
Independent
Dependent
Control
Variable
Variable
(1 point)
(1 point)
(1 point) Duration
(1 point) Presence of
herbivores Trichome density Absence of
herbivores More than one
generation Trichome
density in the
presence of
herbivores Reproductive
success OR
# of plants Plants with lower
trichome density More than one
generation © 2014 The College Board.
Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.org. Prediction
(1 point)
Increased trichome
density relative to
control
Size of the population
with higher trichome
density will be larger
than control population ©2014 The College Board.
Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.org. ©2014 The College Board.
Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.org. ©2014 The College Board.
Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.org. ©2014 The College Board.
Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.org. ©2014 The College Board.
Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.org. ©2014 The College Board.
Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.org.

Science

1 Discuss the issues and difficulties associated with pricing in a managerial environment 2 Discuss the

Question

1. Discuss the issues and difficuies associated with pricing in a managerial environment.

2. Discuss the

relation and connections between profit, value and strategic planning in the managerial environment.

3. Discuss in ways in depth that an understanding of game theory can enhance the managerial strategy of a firm. Answer the question as broadly and completely as you can.

4. Discuss ways in depth that an understanding of contracts can enhance the managerial strategy of a firm. Answer the question as broadly and completely as you can.

(ESSAY QUESTIONS)

(Managerial economics)

MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS Student’s name
Lecturer’s name
Course title
Date of submission 1 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS
Discuss the issues and difficuies associated with pricing in a managerial…
Economics

Hello I need assistance with the following problems Thanks!1 Nitrites are

Question

Hello I need assistance with the following problems. Thanks!

1. Nitrites are

often added to meat products as

preservatives. In a study of the effect of these

chemicals on bacteria, the rate of uptake of a

radio-labeled amino acid was measured for a

number of cuures of bacteria, some growing in

a medium to which nitrites had been added.

Here are the summary statistics from this study.

Group n x s

Nitrite 30 7880 1115

Control 30 8112 1250

Carry out a test of the research hypothesis that

nitrites decrease amino acid uptake at the 2%

significance level.

2. Two methods were used to teach a high

school algebra course. A sample of 75 scores

was selected for method 1, and a sample of 60

scores was selected for method 2. The resus

are:

Method 1 Method 2

Sample mean 85 83

Sample s.d. 3 2

Test whether method 1 was more successful than

method 2 at the 1% level.

3. A private and a public university are located

in the same city. For the private university, 1046

alumni were surveyed and 653 said that they

attended at least one class reunion. For the

public university, 791 out of 1327 sampled

alumni claimed they have attended at least one

class reunion. Is the difference in the sample

proportions statistically significant at the 1%

level?

4. Data taken from a random sample of 60

students chosen from the student population of a

large urban high school indicated that 36 of them

planned to pursue post-secondary education. An

independent random sample of 50 students taken

at a neighboring large suburban high school

resued in data that indicated that 31 of those

students planned to pursue post-secondary

education. Do these data provide sufficient

evidence at the 5% level to reject the hypothesis

that these population proportions are equal?

Question 1 Question 2 Question 3 Question 4
Statistics and Probability

Submit a summary of six of your articles on the discussion board Discuss one strength and one weakness to each of

Question

Submit a summary of six of your articles on the discussion board. Discuss one strength and one weakness to each of

these six articles on why the article may or may not provide sufficient evidence for your practice change.

Cortés, L. L., Wilson, M. P. (2006). Employee Retention in the Texas Long Term Care Workforce.

McGion, K. S., Boscart, V. M., Brown, M., Bowers, B. (2014). Making tradeoffs between the reasons to leave and reasons to stay employed in long-term care homes: Perspectives of licensed nursing staff. International Journal Of Nursing Studies, 51(6), 917-926. doi:10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2013.10.015

Nicholas G. Castle, PhD; Measuring Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes. Gerontologist 2006; 46 (2): 210-219. doi: 10.1093/geront/46.2.210

Tilden, V. P., Thompson, S. A., Gajewski, B. J., Bott, M. J. (2012). End-of-Life Care in Nursing Homes: The High Cost of Staff Turnover. Nursing Economic$, 30(3), 163-166.

Wendsche, J., Hacker, W., Wegge, J., Schrod, N., Roitzsch, K., Tomaschek, A., Kliegel, M. (2014). Rest break organization in geriatric care and turnover: A muimethod cross-sectional study. International Journal Of Nursing Studies, 51(9), 1246-1257. doi:10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2014.01.006

Texas Center for Nursing Workforce Studies Long Term Care Nurse Staffing Study

Please include the strength and weakness

Running head: ARTICLES SUMMARY Articles Summary
Student Name
Course Name
July 29, 2017 1 ARTICLES SUMMARY 2 Articles Summary
1. Cortés, L. L., amp; Wilson, M. P. (2006). Employee Retention in the…
Science

Need assistance with a response to the attached discussion points regarding Crosscultural Evangelism Each

Question

Need assistance with a response to the attached discussion points regarding Cross-cuural Evangelism. Each

discussion point requires a response of at least 150 words.

Discussion One Response
The traditional objective, to go out and bring back the lost to God’s fold, has never changed. From the
discussion, it is clear that the Church in Dubai is aiming to…
Religious Studies

Respond to the questions with a paragraph each at the end of Case Study 9 1

See attachment. Please no

Question

Respond to the questions with a paragraph each at the end of Case Study 9.1. See attachment. Please no

plagerism. Kate Turabian Citation Style

1 Case Study 9.1 Responses
Question 1
Learning about the self is an important factor in becoming an authentic leader. For the
case of Sally Helgesen, she realized had a strong believe in what she…
Religious Studies

Write a 500750word essay on the transformation of American society after WWII Discuss important topics like

Question

Write a 500-750-word essay on the transformation of American society after WWII. Discuss important topics like

suburbanization, the GI Bill, the automobile, and the effects of consumerism on society and gender spheres, racial experiences, and youth cuure. Conclude your essay by answering the following question: What was the role of religion in post-WWII society?

Use a minimum of three of the sources provided to support your assignment and be sure to cite the sources.

Student Name
Student Affiliation
Date
The world war two ended finally during the summer of the year 1945. Suburbanization was the process of lower residential density, industrial and commercial…
US History

Question Watsamata University requires all applicants to take an admission examination

Question

Question:Watsamata University requires all applicants to take an admission examination

specifically developed for the University. The test is composed of 100 muiple-choice items. To evaluate the utility of test for admission decisions the university conducted a pilot study in which, for one year, all students who were admitted to the university took the test. The descriptive statistics from the study are presented in Table 1. The relationship between scores on the admission test and freshman year GPA is displayed in the scatter plot shown in Figure 1.

Table 1. Descriptive statistics for admission test evaluation study. N = 50 (photo Attached)

QUESTION: How do I Construct a regression formula for this test and freshman GPA, and use it to calculate the predicted freshman year GPA for the student who scored 63 on the admissions examination?

Statistics and Probability

When considering the feasibility of a study’s problem and purpose Grove Gray and Burns (2015)

Question

When considering the feasibility of a study’s problem and purpose, Grove, Gray, and Burns (2015)

suggest that several areas should be evaluated, including: researcher expertise, money commitment, ethical considerations, and availability of subjects, facilities, and equipment. Which of the following statements accurately assesses the feasibility of this article? (Select all that apply)

a. Funding sources for the study were clearly identified in the article.

b. The author’s credentials to design and conduct research are described.

c. Evidence of protection of the subjects’ rights was mentioned in this article.

d. 100% of the eligible subjects contacted participated in the study.

DECREASED STRESS LEVELS IN NURSES: A BENEFIT OF QUIET TIME By Heather C. Riemer, RN, BA, CCRN, Joanna Mates, RN, MSN, Linda Ryan, RN, PhD, AHN-BC, and Bonnie J. Schleder, EdD, APN, CCRN

©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4037/ajcc2015706

Background The benefits of quiet time, a therapeutic method of improving the heah care environment, have been evaluated in patients, but only a few studies have examined the effects of quiet time on intensive care nurses. Objective To evaluate the effects of implementing quiet time in a medical-surgical intensive care unit on levels of light, noise, and nurses’ stress. Methods Quiet time consisted of turning down the unit lights for a designated time. Levels of light, noise, and nurses’ stress were measured. Nurses’ stress levels were measured by using a 100-point visual analog scale; unit noise, by using a digital sound level meter (model 407736, Extech Instruments); and unit light, by using an illumination light meter (model 615, Huygen Corporation). Measurements were obtained 30 minutes before and 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 2 hours after implementation of quiet time. Resus Analysis of variance and comparisons of means indicated that both light levels and nurses’ stress levels were significantly decreased after quiet time (both P .001). Noise levels were also decreased after quiet time, but the decrease was not significant (P = .08). Conclusions Use of quiet time resued in decreased light levels and decreased stress levels among nurses. Quiet time is an easily performed energy-saving intervention to promote a heahy work environment. (American Journal of Critical Care. 2015;24:396-402)

396 AJCC AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CRITICAL CARE, September 2015, Volume 24, No. 5 www.ajcconline.org

Nursing theorists Nightingale1 and Watson2 advocated for creating healing environments to benefit both patients and nurses. In intensive care units (ICUs), nurses must cope with a dynamic stressful environment.3 Nurses perceive this environment as a top heah and safety concern.4-6 The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses emphasizes the importance of creating heahy work environments for nurses.7 This focus leads to interventions to generate positive outcomes and creates an environment where nurses can optimally contribute. The honor society of nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International, focuses on the emotional regulation of stress as a component of the heahy work environment.8 Inadequacy in the physical environment of an ICU contributes to nurses’ stress, fatigue, and burnout.9

Noise and lighting are 2 independent variables of the ICU that contribute to nurses’ stress.9 ICUs are brightly lit, chaotic, and noisy environments that can overstimulate patients and staff. ICU light and noise levels generally exceed heahy parameters and are recognized as environmental pollutants.10 In order to limit environmental pollutants in the hospital, optimal light and sound levels have been recommended. The Illuminating Engineering Society recommends that light levels be set at 108 lux (to convert lux to lumens per square foot, divide by 10.76), with a maximum of 323 lux, during the day. The higher value (323 lux) is the level needed to read a book in a hospital room.11 The World Heah Organization recommends sound levels of 35 dB or less in patients’ rooms.12 Sound levels in the ICU exceed this recommendation. In a comprehensive and systematic analysis of 3 hospital units, mean noise levels were 55 to 60 dB throughout a 24-hour period.13 In a research study14 of 5 intensive care units, mean noise levels were greater than 45 dB at all times and between 52 and 59 dB more than 50% of the time. Even at levels of 45 dB, noise disrupts routine communication and activity.15 In noisy, busy ICUs, conversations naturally increase because of the Lombard effect, the propensity for speakers to involuntarily increase the pitch, intensity, and duration of their voice in the presence

of noise.16 This noise pollution resus in adverse outcomes, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, sleep disturbances, and impaired wound healing. Uncontrolled noise triggers the human stress response, activating the sympathetic nervous system to release epinephrine and norepinephrine, which constrict the vessels and elevate blood pressure and heart rate.17,18 Excessive noise levels have adverse effects on both the physical and the psychological state of the body, resuing in stress. People generally adapt to noisy work environments by becoming intensely focused, thereby becoming less interpersonally engaged. The frequency of errors is also related to excessive noise and is correlated with tension.19 Noise-induced stress is an independent predictor of burnout.15 Employees who suffer burnout can experience emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a feeling of decreased personal accomplishment.20 Light exposure also resus in physical and psychological effects, because of its influence on the body’s 24-hour circadian rhythm. Circadian rhythm affects hormones such as melatonin.21 If exposure to light is too great, secretion of melatonin is decreased and its stress-protective effects are minimized. Light and noise also stimulate the release of corticosteroids (cortisol) and catecholamines, which are physiologically associated with excessive stress levels.18,22 Exposure to light, especially artificial lighting, can produce psychological adverse effects on nurses.23 These effects can change a person’s mood and aer alertness. Dynamic lighting, which has light settings with different combinations of intensity and color temperature, is used to support both mental alertness and relaxation.24 The changes in light settings are similar to the changes in daylight, which varies in intensity and color. The variation in intensity through interventions such as dynamic lighting can be used

About the Authors Heather C. Riemer is a critical care nurse, UW Medicine Valley Medical Center, Renton, Washington. Joanna Mates is a critical care nurse and Bonnie J. Schleder is a critical care clinical nurse specialist, Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital, Barrington, Illinois. Linda Ryan is an assistant professor, College of Nursing and Heah Professions, Lewis University, Romeoville, Illinois.

Corresponding author: Bonnie J. Schleder, 22970 N Bridle Trail, Kildeer, IL 60047 (e-mail: bonnie.schleder@ advocateheah.com).

www.ajcconline.org AJCC AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CRITICAL CARE, September 2015, Volume 24, No. 5 397

Sound levels in intensive care units exceed recommended levels.

398 AJCC AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CRITICAL CARE, September 2015, Volume 24, No. 5 www.ajcconline.org

Data were collected 30 minutes before and then 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 2 hours after the start of quiet time.

to stimulate the natural activation and relaxation cycle needed for a heahy work environment.25 A therapeutic method of improving the environment is the implementation of quiet time. Trials of quiet time have been successful, and the method is used as a therapeutic patient intervention in some hospitals. Gardner et al26 used quiet time as a therapeutic intervention in a fast-paced, acute care environment to lower the noise level at certain times during the day to promote patients’ rest. In another study,27 when quiet time was implemented in a neurological ICU, significantly lower noise and light levels resued in greater sleep for patients. To expand this concept, Morrison et al28 evaluated the impact of noise on nurses’ stress and annoyance in a pediatric ICU. A significant correlation occurred between higher sound levels and greater subjective stress and annoyance; however, the effect of light was not measured in the study.28 Because lowering noise levels can beneficially affect relaxation and patients’ well-being, we assessed whether a simple measure such as turning down the lights to initiate quiet time affected noise and stress levels of nurses working in a medical-surgical ICU.

Methods The study was reviewed and approved by the appropriate institutional review board and was completed in accordance with ethical standards set forth in the Helsinki Declaration of 1975. Information about the study was introduced to all registered nurses in the ICU at mandatory staff meetings. Nurses were asked to volunteer to participate, and those who were interested were thoroughly educated on the study procedures, use of the 100-point visual analog scale (VAS) of the Perceived Stress survey,29 and the risks and benefits of the study. Permission was obtained from Goodfellow29 to use the Perceived Stress survey. Data collection was performed solely by 2 trained nurse researchers to maintain consistency in methods. Informed consent and demographic data were obtained from all the participating nurses. The intervention and methods for collecting data were kept simple so that the study could be easily performed and reproduced.

Sample Population The sample consisted of day-shift registered nurses who worked in the medical-surgical ICU. Day shift was defined as the shift from 7 AM to 7:30 PM.

The day-shift nurses were the only eligible candidates because quiet time was implemented from 2 PM to 4 PM. Nurses were included in the sample if they consented to participate in the study, served as a primary nurse, and were present in the ICU from 2 PM to 4 PM. Agency and float nurses who consented to participate in the study were included in the sample if they were intensive care nurses. Nurses were excluded from the sample if they were non-ICU nurses who were in the ICU taking care of overflow patients who did not require intensive care. These nurses were excluded because the researchers thought that the nurses’ stress levels might differ from those of an intensive care nurse. Nurses from other departments in the ICU at time of the data collection, such as those from the operating room, emergency department, endoscopy, or cardiac rehabilitation, were also excluded because they were not primary nurses of the ICU patients.

Data Collection Data were collected 4 times a day for each nurse: 30 minutes before and then 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 2 hours after quiet time initiation. Data collection surveys were not completed during shifts when cardiopulmonary resuscitation or emergent situations in which a patient posed a threat to self or others occurred.

Procedure Nurse participants for each day were assigned numbers so that they would be surveyed sequentially at the appropriate time intervals. After the nurses were assigned numbers, the researcher calibrated the digital sound level meter (model 407736, Extech Instruments) and the illumination light meter (model 615, Huygen Corporation) according to the manufacturers’ recommendations. The researcher approached nurse No. 1 for the day at the appropriate time intervals and asked the nurse to mark a point on the VAS line on the Perceived Stress survey corresponding to the intensity of the nurse’s current stress level. While the nurse completed the VAS, the researcher measured the sound and light at the location where the nurse was positioned in the unit. The researcher documented the light and sound measurements on a data collection spreadsheet. After turning down the unit’s lights at 2 PM to start quiet time, the researcher sought out the subsequent eligible nurses sequentially and repeated the process at the described intervals. The researchers also documented in a log book instances when data were ineligible, such as when the nurses were not on the unit during the entire period of quiet time. The log book, completed demographic

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surveys, and all data collection tools were kept in a locked drawer accessible solely to the researchers.

Data Analysis Collected data were transferred into SPSS for Windows, version 20.0, software (IBM SPSS) for statistical analysis. Demographic data were evaluated descriptively to determine characteristics of the participants and are reported as number and percentages or means and standard deviations. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to assess the differences in light, noise, and nurses’ stress levels before and after quiet time. Statistical significance was set at the .05 level.

Resus The study consisted of 124 observations of 22 clinical nurses who worked in the ICU. Ahough 142 observations occurred, 18 were not included in analysis. One observation was excluded because of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of a patient; all other excluded observations were due to the nurse not being on the unit the entire time. Of the participating nurses, 18% (4) were men and 82% (18) were women; 77% (17) of the nurses worked full time, and 23% (5) worked part time. Among the participants, 27% (6) had less than 5 years of nursing experience, 36% (8) had 6 to 10 years, and 36% (8) had more than 10 years (percentages may not total 100 because of rounding). Light level decreased significantly (P .001; Figure 1) from baseline (mean, 369 lux) through 2 hours after quiet time (mean, 179 lux). Ahough noise decreased from baseline (mean, 62.93 dB) through 1 hour after quiet time (mean, 60.88 dB), the level began to increase at 2 hours after quiet time (mean, 61.69 dB; Figure 2). Finally, the stress scores reported by the nurses decreased significantly

(P .001; Figure 3) from baseline (mean, 46.36) to 2 hours after quiet time (mean, 35.36). Comparisons of means determined that light decreased significantly over time (P .001; see Table). Significant differences in light were identified between baseline and 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 2 hours after quiet time. The decrease in light 30 minutes after quiet time did not differ significantly from the decrease at 1 hour after quiet time or the decrease at 2 hours after quiet time. The difference between 1 hour and 2 hours after quiet time also was not significant. Compared with the baseline value, noise was also decreased at 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 2 hours after quiet time (see Table). However, analysis of variance indicated that mean decibels did not decrease significantly over time (P = .08). In comparison, nurses’ stress levels decreased significantly over time (P .001). After the lights were turned down, the baseline values differed significantly from the values at 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 2 hours after quiet time. Both the values at 30 minutes and the values at 1 hour differed significantly from the values at 2 hours after quiet time (see Table).

Discussion Our resus indicate that a significant change in light occurred after the implementation of quiet time and remained throughout the quiet time. The finding that turning down the lights resued in significantly less light from baseline throughout the study was not surprising. What was surprising was that in a busy chaotic ICU, turning down the lights was welcomed. Nurses were initially worried about a lack of visibility due to decreased lighting. Once the nurses experienced the change in light, visibility was no longer a concern. Quiet time was also sustained after the conclusion of the research study.

Figure 1 Mean scores for light over time. To convert lux to lumens per square foot, divide by 10.76.

Timing of data collection relative to implementation of quiet time

Light, lux

54

0

30 min after Baseline 1 hr after 2 hr after

108

161

215

269

323

377

430

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The important finding in our study is that nurses’ stress decreased with the implementation of quiet time, which consisted of simply turning down the lights. Because no other interventions

(eg, coaching staff to turn off pagers, limiting procedures, or restricting family members’ visits) were performed during this time, data collection was easily done by 1 researcher per day. Light and noise

Figure 2 Mean scores for noise over time.

Timing of data collection relative to implementation of quiet time

Noise, dB

30 min after Baseline 1 hr after 2 hr after

60.5

60.0

59.5

61.0

61.5

62.0

62.5

63.0

63.5

Figure 3 Mean scores for stress over time.

Timing of data collection relative to implementation of quiet time

Nurses’ stress score

30 min after Baseline 1 hr after 2 hr after

10 5 0

20 15 25 30 35 40 45 50

Variable Baseline

30 Minutes after

1 Hour after

2 Hours after F score

Table Repeated-measures analysis of variance comparing mean (SD) levels of light, noise, and stress before and after implementation of quiet time

Light,a lux Noise, dB Stress score

.001 .08 .001

95.601 3.203 25.609

179 (171) 61.69 (5.0) 35.36 (26.2)

180 (161) 60.88 (9.1) 34.31 (25.9)

152 (162) 60.89 (7.5) 40.70 (26.6)

369 (102) 62.93 (5.7) 46.36 (28.5)

P

aTo convert lux to lumens per square foot, divide by 10.76.

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were measured at the participants’ location when they filled out the Perceived Stress survey, isolating the potential environmental influence on nurses’ stress at the time stress was reported. Controlling an environmental pollutant such as light may promote a heahy work environment, because excessive light resus in physiological changes that stimulate the stress response, including the release of cortisol and catecholamines. The environmental change of turning down the lights could explain the physiological decrease in nurses’ stress levels. Perhaps this decrease in stress was the reason nurses in a chaotic ICU continued to turn down the lights even after the research study was completed. The nurses simply fe better. The reduction in noise in our study is also an important physiological heah outcome because noise-induced stress may resu in staff burnout. More research with the measurement of noise during the full duration of quiet time might yield statistically significant resus. Because the effect of noise on physiological heah is known, another research approach might be to add interventions that decrease noise. Decreased noise is also a measure of patient satisfaction, and promotion of rest without distraction is viewed as a nursing function to promote healing. In institutions where noise levels have been decreased by implementation of quiet time for patients’ benefits, determining the impact of the environmental change on heah care workers would be useful.

Limitations and Recommendations Limitations of this study included performing the intervention in a single ICU, at specific intervals, with participation by nurses who worked day shifts only. Replication of the study in additional hospitals, on different nursing units, on other shifts, and with a larger sample size of nurses and other heah care workers would be useful. Such a study would help reach a wider critical care community in which the structural configuration of the unit and the composition of heah care workers might differ. Our study was performed during 5 weeks during May and June; the patient census and acuity level may differ between seasons. Additionally, we did not consider sociodemographic variables of individual nurses or patients. Future researchers might consider performing the study for a longer period, at times outside the 2-hour period we used, and including acuity, census levels, and demographic variables in the research design. Also missing from our study is a more thorough comparison of stress levels determined before quiet time. With measurements taken at more intervals throughout a shift, a researcher might be able to isolate the loudest or

brightest times of day in a unit, as well as times of highest perceived stress. These resus may indicate the best time to implement quiet time.

Conclusions Implementation of quiet time, defined as turning down the lights in an ICU between 2 PM and 4 PM, resued in a significantly decreased mean light level. Ahough noise levels also decreased over time, the change was not significant. Nurses’ stress levels decreased significantly, confirming that controlling light may resu in decreased stress levels and promote a heahier ICU working environment, a change that might lead to better patient care and less staff turnover. Ahough quiet time was an easily performed, energy-saving intervention, more research is needed to better analyze and develop interventions to promote greater physiological and psychological heah for nurses, patients, and patients’ families in the critical care community.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We thank the intensive care nurses for their participation in the research study. Data analysis and manuscript review were performed by Suela Sulo, PhD, James R. and Helen D. Russell Institute for Research and Innovation, Advocate Lutheran General Hospital, Park Ridge, Illinois

Science

1 Give the name of the

journal
and the
year
in which this article was

Question

1. Give the name of the journal and the year in which this article was

published.

2. What are the last names of the authors? What are their universities?

3. What type of organism is being studied? Give genus and species names.

4. What is the hypothesis of the experiment?

5. Describe each graph in detail, making sure to discuss how each graph relates to the hypothesis of the paper.

6. a. What is the major conclusion of the study?

6. b. What will the researchers do next, based on the current resus of this study?

Running head: THE TYPE IV PILIN MEDIATING SPECIFIC DNA IDENTIFICACTION
1 The Type IV Pilin Mediating Specific DNA Identification
Students Name:
Institution:
Date: THE TYPE IV PILIN MEDIATING…
Science

Question 1A researcher asked 25 customers how much would you pay for a television adapter with Internet

Question

Question 1

A researcher asked 25 customers: how much would you pay for a television adapter with Internet

Access?’ Their grouped responses are as follows:

(a) calculate the mean of the dataset

(b) calculate the variance of the dataset

Question 2

A researcher is interested in whether or not University students study for 10 hours or more a week. A sample of 100 students is taken.

you are given the following set of information :

the probability that a randomly selected student from a University is a female is 0.55

the probability that a student studies for 10 hours or more a week is 0.60

given that the student selected studies 10 hours or more a week, the probability that this student is male is 0.4


A researcher asked 25 customers: quot; how much would you pay for a television adapter with Internet Access?’ Their grouped responses are as follows: Class Interval Frequency
0­99 2
100­199…
Statistics and Probability

Scenarios in the case study address Course Outcomes 1 Use relevant vocabulary including

Question

Scenarios in the case study address Course Outcomes:

1. Use relevant vocabulary, including

anatomical positions, to describe human anatomy and physiology and the role of homeostasis and metabolism in the normal functioning of organ systems.

2. Apply knowledge of the chemical basis of life and biological processes to explain basic cell structure and function as it relates to the development of tissues and organs in anatomy and physiology.

3. Use the scientific method to apply the principles of anatomy and physiology to form hypotheses and draw conclusions related to real-world problems about human systems.

4. Using quantitative reasoning, analyze and interpret vital signs and other diagnostic measurements to make decisions about heah status.

CASE STUDY REPORT – BIOL 164 General Outline

Student is presented with a medical case study scenario.

case study report with 6 content area subheadings. Make sure you answer all the questions comprehensively. Use complete sentences.

1. Diagnosis Name

What is the name of the disease/disorder?

2. Explanation

What are the reasons for your diagnosis?|

3. Causes/Risk Factors

What are some of the factors that put this patient at risk for the disease?

What other questions might you have for the patient that would provide you with more data?

4. Clinical Manifestation

Describe the clinical features of the disease that are present in the individual.

5. Diagnostic Procedures

What types of procedures were done on the patient and what were the resus?

Are there other diagnostic procedures that you would like to have performed? If so, which ones and why?

6. Treatment

Describe the treatment plan that you would prescribe for this patient.

Case: Ms. Johnson is a 61-year-old woman presenting today with a chief complaint of a hand tremor that has worsened over the past three years. The tremor occurs when she uses her hands for activities such as slicing vegetables, sewing, putting on her lipstick, or typing at her computer. Her handwriting has become messy and sprawling and very difficu to read. She has worked for 23 years as an executive assistant; as a resu of her tremor and the associated difficuies, she is considering retirement. She notes that on the rare occasion that she consumes alcohol, the tremor is somewhat improved.

Family history is positive for two grandparents who also had the shakes later in life. She assumes that they both had Parkinson’s disease and is afraid that’s what’s wrong with me, too.

Medications include an antihypertensive, a statin, and an estrogen patch. Today her BP is 120/62. Height is 5’6, weight 139 lbs. On physical examination, mental status, cranial nerves, sensation, muscle strength, tone, and deep tendon reflexes are all normal. There is a mild tremor bilaterally in both hands as she writes her name. No tremor at rest. There is no bradykinesia or rigidity noted. Voice is somewhat tremulous. There is a slight involuntary back-and-forth horizontal rotation of the head.

Lab data, including lipids, TSH and FBS are all within normal limits.

What is your diagnosis and how would you proceed?

Science

Regarding organic chem lab questions 1 Why is the stemless funnel Used instead of the longstem funnel To

Question

Regarding organic chem lab questions

1. Why is the stemless funnel Used instead of the longstem funnel To

fier Hot solutions Through fluted Fier paper? After recrystallization,Why is the final product Be isolated by Vacuum Firation But not by Gravity firation?

2.One student Re-crystallized 3 g of impure napthalene Which was 90% purity,However only 0.4Grams of the pure product was Obtained.From the 10 Choices Given below,Choose five reasons Which could Lead to The low yield.

a)That heating time was too long When dissolving the impure napthalene In methanol

b)The heating temperature was too lowWhen dissolving the impure napthalene in methanol

c)When doing The gravity firation,The longstem funnel is used

d)When doing the gravity firation, The fier paper is fluted

e)Some solution was left in the flask after decanting

f)The calcium chloride Was not added enough when drying the solution

g)When doing The suction firation,The solution was chilled

h)when doing the suction firation,The fier paper was fluted

i)When doing the section firation,The vacuum was not good

j)Mind giving the suction firation,Methanol is used to wash

3.One student distilled A mixture Of methanol And 1-butanol With simple distillation And collected the distallate in 3 vials But each distallate in Vials was not pure. Please list two methods To improve the separation effect and explain.

4.Please write the reaction For the synthesis of methyl orange From the starting material Of sulfanic acid and N,N-dimethylanaline.

Science

(04 01 MC)Kyra is using rectangular tiles of two types for a floor design A tile of each type is

Question

Which optionbestclassifies Saul’s statements?

Statement 1 is a theorem because it can be proved, and Statement 2 is a postulate because it is a true fact. Statement 1 and Statement 2 are theorems because they can be proved. Statement 1 and Statement 2 are postulates because they are true facts. Statement 1 is a postulate because it is a true fact, and Statement 2 is a theorem because it can be proved.

Question 27 (Muiple Choice Worth 1 points)

(04.02 MC)

Trapezoid ABCD is similar to trapezoid EFGH. Side AD is proportional to side ___.

EF FG GH EH

Question 28 (Muiple Choice Worth 1 points)

(04.01 MC)

Bradley and Kelly are out flying kites at a park one afternoon. A model of Bradley and Kelly’s kites are shown below on the coordinate plane as kites BRAD and KELY, respectively:

Which statement is correct about the two kites?

They are not similar because is 1:2 and is 2:1. They are similar because is 1:2 and is 1:2. They are not similar because is 1:2 and is 2:1. They are similar because is 2:1 and is 2:1.

Question 29 (Muiple Choice Worth 1 points)

(01.02 MC)

Dan uses a compass to draw an arc from Q as shown. He wants to construct a line segment through R that makes the same angle with as , as shown below:

Which figure shows the next step to construct a congruent angle at R?

Question 30 (Muiple Choice Worth 1 points)

(03.04 MC)

The figure below shows a parallelogram ABCD. Side AB is parallel to side DC, and side AD is parallel to side BC:

A student wrote the following sentences to prove that the two pairs of parallel opposite sides of parallelogram ABCD are congruent:

For triangles ABD and CDB, aernate interior angles ABD and CDB are congruent because AB and DC are parallel lines. Aernate interior angles ADB and CBD are congruent because AD and BC are parallel lines. DB is congruent to DB by transitive property. The triangles ABD and CDB are congruent by ASA postulate. As corresponding parts of congruent triangles are congruent, AB is congruent to DC and AD is congruent to BC by CPCTC.

Which statement best describes a flaw in the student’s proof?

Angles ADB and CBD are congruent because they are corresponding angles. Angles ADB and CBD are congruent because they are vertical angles. DB is congruent to DB by reflexive property. DB is congruent to DB by associative property.

Question 31 (Muiple Choice Worth 1 points)

(05.03 MC)

Look at the figure below:

Based on the figure, which pair of triangles is congruent by the Side Angle Side Postulate?

Triangle ABE and Triangle CBE Triangle AEB and Triangle CED Triangle BEC and Triangle DEC Triangle ABC and Triangle DCE

Question 32 (Muiple Choice Worth 1 points)

(02.02 MC)

Trapezoid ABCD is reflected over the line y = x. What rule shows the input and output of the reflection, and what is the new coordinate of A’?

(x, y) → (y, −x); A’ is at (1, 5) (x, y) → (y, x); A’ is at (1, −5) (x, y) → (−x, y); A’ is at (5, 1) (x, y) → (−x, −y); A’ is at (5, −1)

Question 33 (Muiple Choice Worth 1 points)

(04.04 MC)

Triangle RST is dilated to create triangle UVW on a coordinate grid. You are given that angle T is congruent to angle W. What other information is required to prove that the two triangles are similar?

Segments RS and UV are congruent. Angle S is congruent to angle V. Segment RT is congruent to segment UW, and segment ST is congruent to segment VW. Angle S is congruent to angle U.

Question 34 (Muiple Choice Worth 1 points)

(01.05 MC)

What construction does the image below demonstrate?

An equilateral triangle circumscribed about a circle An equilateral triangle inscribed in a circle The circumcenter of an equilateral triangle The incenter of an equilateral triangle

Question 35 (Muiple Choice Worth 1 points)

(04.04 MC)

Are the two triangles below similar?

Yes; they have congruent corresponding angles. Yes; they have proportional corresponding sides. No; they do not have proportional corresponding sides. No; they do not have congruent corresponding angles.

Question 36 (Muiple Choice Worth 1 points)

(02.03 MC)

Kite ABCD is rotated 180 degrees clockwise about the origin and then reflected over the y-axis, followed by a reflection over the x-axis. What is the location of point A after the transformations are complete?

(5, −1) (−5, 1) (−5, −1) (5, 1)

Question 37 (Muiple Choice Worth 1 points)

(02.02 MC)

What set of reflections would carry trapezoid ABCD onto itself?

x-axis, y=x, y-axis, x-axis x-axis, y-axis, x-axis y=x, x-axis, x-axis y-axis, x-axis, y-axis, x-axis

Question 38 (Muiple Choice Worth 1 points)

(02.05 MC)

Triangle ABC has been translated to create triangle A’B’C’. Angles C and C’ are both 32 degrees, angles B and B’ are both 72 degrees, and sides BC and B’C’ are both 5 units long. Which postulate below would prove the two triangles are congruent?

SSS SAS ASA AAS

Question 39 (Muiple Choice Worth 1 points)

(02.01 MC)

Triangle END is translated using the rule (x, y) → (x − 4, y − 1) to create triangle E’N’D’. If a line segment is drawn from point E to point E’ and from point N to point N’, which statement would bestdescribe the line segments drawn?

They are parallel and congruent. They are perpendicular to each other. They share the same midpoints. They create diameters of concentric circles.

Question 40 (Muiple Choice Worth 1 points)

(04.04 MC)

If triangle ABC is similar to triangle DEF, which statement is true about the two triangles?

Segment AB is congruent to segment DE, and angles C and F are congruent. Segment BC is proportional to segment EF, and angles A and D are congruent. Segment AB is congruent to segment DE, and angles C and F are proportional. Segment BC is proportional to segment EF, and angles A and D are proportional.

Math

Please prepare a 1500 word essay on the impact of resiliency in Catholics who remarry Please use MLA format for

Question

Please prepare a 1500 word essay on the impact of resiliency in Catholics who remarry. Please use MLA format for

all citiations and work previoulsy not submitted in Course Hero

Running Head: RESILIENCY Impact of resiliency in Catholics who remarry 1 Running Head: RESILIENCY 2 Introduction
As like the other religion, Catholic people have some principles that guide…
Religious Studies

Please review for grammar and criteria below How telenursing is contributing to a change in the

Question

Please review for grammar and criteria below.

How telenursing is contributing to a change in the

role of the nurse.

Criteria that must be met

Student used standard essay format: Introduction/Body/Conclusion.

Student demonstrated proper use of grammar, spelling, punctuation, citation style, etc.

Student demonstrated an understanding of course content and key concepts, as discussed in the text.

Student was able to examine, assess, evaluate, and/or analyze course content and key concepts.

Student provided a clear and well-developed response to the question.

Telenursing refers to the use of telecommunications and information technology for providing nursing services to patients. The most progressive area of telenursing is within home teleheah care, also referred to as teletriage. Using teleheah, nurses can continue to educate discharged patients at home as questions about their care and condition arise. In addition to being able to distribute information remotely to a discharged patient, using tele-heah checks offers better patient recovery resus than leaving recovery up to the patient at home without remote monitoring.

The concept of telenursing is exciting as patient’s vitals through thermometers, sphygmomanometers and stethoscopes can all be connected and remotely monitor the data needed to deliver quality patient care. In the medically underserved rural areas of this country, teleheah will be making a huge difference, as these folks now have access to care that they may have had to drive hours for previously for simple wellness checks and advise on basic heah care.

Through telenursing, these nurses are afforded the opportunity to work from home and/or in call centers, instead of being in a heah care setting the whole day. This option also provides nurses autonomy to make diagnosis on their own, though some nurses expressed a conflict between what they thought was best for the client versus what the heah care services could provide. A negative drawback I can see with telenursing is the privacy of the conversation between the call center, and where the client is speaking to the nurse. Another would be when the nurse is capturing the vitals from a patient, if that patient is attaching the monitoring device correctly to get true information for the diagnosis.

Telenursing as well as any remote care options will be the wave of the future. With the rise in wait times, heah care costs, and medical professional employment issues, this will help providers give the best care for basic procedures freeing up wait times and physicians for more important procedures. Heah care companies will have to continue to invest time and resources to the privacy for patients in order to make telenursing work, but overall it is a step in the right direction to provide heah care to all with no borders.

Writing