Critic of Pollock’s Art

Nevertheless, he also lauds Pollock’s genius in combining murals and drama as expressed by the use of Cubism, similar to that of Mexican muralists. After criticizing Pollock’s self-portrait, the critic then narrates the interesting and exciting journeys of Pollock into his life as an artist. Definitely, the mania that Pollock had on creating his work famous work Mural cannot be denied since he persevered day and night, relentlessly painting until he finished the work.The critic considers Pollock a rebel in expressing Abstract Art through his ( Pollock’s) extensive use of drippings that seem to be random but would converge later and produce a work of Art. In fact, Haber’s critic of Pollock’s works was satirical since asserted that his style was betweenImpressionism and Sunday Painting ( paragraph 3). Nevertheless, Haber salutes Pollock’s ability to scrawl which is an indicator of maturity in artists. The article also noted that this method of Pollock scared his future wife Lee Krasner.First, paint takes over its shallow space. It gets denser, a painting symmetry gets more obvious, and the technique gets varied and absorbing. A physicist has actually quantified the symmetry, not implausibly, with fractal geometry. When Pollock calls a painting Simmering Substance, one sees the heat but feels a refreshing cool.Despite these admirable comments of Haber, he still tries to psychoanalyze Pollock as he constantly inserts bits of the artist’s life in his article. Apparently, Pollock’s art is an expression of his grief and losses in life that can be attributed to his being an alcoholic. Similarly, Haber discussed the issue of depression by giving its operational definition according to the renowned psychologist and novelist Juliet Kristeva. It seems that Kristeva’s life has parallelism with Pollock’s. Haber then established the depression of Pollock and how it largely influenced his artworks.The article achieved abalance by citing the role of Lee Krasner in enhancing Pollock’s life as an artist. Aside from being a duty-bound wife struggling to cover his alcoholic husband, Haber relates that she was instrumental in introducing Pollock to Cubism. But the more refreshing part of the review was Haber’s analysis of how Pollock gained acceptance of the feminine side of art which is undoubtedly an influence of his wife.

Graphic Design

Although he was an excellent song writer and poet, William concentrated on the construction and decoration of buildings. Red house (William and Jane’s home) As seen in his works and character, William Morris ‘approach is more vibrant colorful and rich in aesthetics. He is big on color, textures of fabric. As a result, his work is more welcoming and pleasant to the eye as it is sophisticated. WALTER GROPIUS He was born in Berlin in 1883 and is remembered as a ground breaking architect and designer as well as the founder of the Bauhaus. Having discontinued his architecture studies in Munich, he went ahead and practiced as a freelance architect who had particular interest and taste in glass walls that seemed almost weightless. Evidently, his style in design did without historism, ornaments and the use of symbolic features. His emphasis was based mainly on the functionality of basic geometric bodies. A sample of his work includes the Faguswerk and the Musterfabrik done in the early 1911. … This designer has always denied that it is in him to design instead. he says that his agenda is to establish the methodology of design COMPARISON AND CONTRAST Although the two designers emerged from different worlds, William was from England and Walter from Germany, the two had some similarities to them. Walter was more concerned with the fit of the final work and space thereby the symmetry and geometry of the design sand final product while William was concerned with colorful well manicured and aesthetically appealing designs. At the end of the day, both had the same goal, to provide satisfactory and unique products for their clients. William’s philosophy of ‘less is more ‘shows that he was more concerned with the look and the design of his work and the general appeal it would have at the end of its construction. On the other hand, Walter is more concerned, not with designing, but explaining and finding meaning in the methodology of the designs. His work is therefore more mathematically calculated as is seen in his keenness to handiwork and the fit of planes and the close supervision of the production process from the beginning to the end. According to location of their work (Architectural) Water’s work does not require a lot of land for the sitting of his buildings as opposed to William whose intricate designs are flashier and require space for their luxury to be seen. 2. Using two images from each style (total of 4 images form any of our texts), describe how you would evaluate the importance of De Stijl and Constructivism on the development of modern design. Answer De Stijl is a Dutch word for Style. Walter The philosophy of his style was based on functionalism with a severe and doctrinaire insistence on the

Scientific paper about reconstructing 3D models of buildings

First, most of it is unorganized, uncalibrated, have uncontrolled illumination, image quality and resolution and is widely variable. In essence, coming up with a computer vision technique that can work with most of these images has proved to be a challenge for most researchers. Now how can researchers work with this huge resource. this paper proposes solution such as Image Based Rendering algorithm and Structure from Motion. While a few other researchers such as Brown and Lowe (Lowe 395) have used Structure from Motion to tackle the above problems, the technique used in this paper has several modifications. Structure from Motion is effective in 3D visualization and scene modeling and can operate on hundreds of images obtained from keyword queries (photo tourism). Through photo tourism, it is possible to reconstruct many world sites. In effect, an algorithm that can work effectively on internet photos can enable vital applications such as 3D visualization, communication/media sharing, and localization. Two recent breakthroughs in the field of computer vision namely Structure from Motion and Feature Matching will be the backbone of this paper. Through these techniques, it is possible to reconstruct buildings in 3D to offer virtual and interactive tours for internet users. You can also evaluate the current state of a building and identify degradation and areas that may require renovation or reconstruction. Further, we can come up with creations or display of any building of interest as long as we have its image. Sparse geometry and camera reconstruction The browsing and visualization components of this system requires exact information in regards to the orientation, relative location and inherent parameters like focal lengths for each photo in a collection and sparse three dimension scene geometry. The system also requires a geo-referenced coordinate frame. For the most part, this information can be obtained through electronic components and Global Positioning System gadgets over the internet. Image files in EXIF tags often have this data though the vast majority of these sources are mostly inaccurate. As such, this system will compute this data via computer vision techniques. First, we will detect feature points in every image after which the system will equate feature points between pairs of images. Finally, the system will run an iterative Structure from Motion procedure to retrieve the camera parameters. Since Structure from Motion procedure will only produce estimates and our system requires absolute values, the system will run iterative procedure to acquire better estimates. How this whole procedure unfolds is detailed below. Detecting feature points will be done using SIFT keypoint detector (Lowe 411). This technique has better invariance to image alteration. The next step is matching keypoint descriptors using the approximate bordering neighbors. For instance, if we want to match two images I and J, first we will create a kd-tree obtained from element descriptors in J. Next, for each element in I we will locate an adjacent neighbor in J using the kd-tree. For effectiveness, we can use ANN’s priority search algorithm. This technique limits each query to visit a maximum of two hundred bins in the kd-tree. Alternatively, we can use a technique described by Lowe (Lowe 95). In the technique, for each

Draw The Most Important Lewis Structure For

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a ) Election Group geometry
The no. of lom pairs phy The covalent bonds
Comesponds to Elector pair Geometry.
quot; Electun pair Geometry…

I’M Doing A Practice Problem For Computational Geometry And Would Like Some Clarification On How To Solve This

Question

I’m doing a practice problem for Computational Geometry and would like some clarification on how to solve this

part of a question:

For each n 3, find a polygon with n vertices with exactly two triangulations.

In other words, find a generic family of examples of n-gons, each having exactly two triangulations, such that it is clear that your family includes arbitrarily large n-gons – e.g., we have seen the family of convex n-gons, Chvatal combs (which were defined for multiples of 3, n = 3k, but extend to values of n not divisible by 3), etc.

One example is to take the
quot; foxquot; example ( a quot;pseudotrinand?
quot; having exactly 3 conver vertices
and (n- 3 ) reflex vertices that
form a single refler chain ( one pocket…Math

The people of the Rennaissance are often reffered to as the first modern Individuals What intellectual contributions did the Renaissance make to liberate Individuals from the costraints of the medieval world

To XX I would like to inform you that the people of renaissance are often referred to as the first modern individuals. The period highlights the wayreligion was interpreted and learning and knowledge used to propagate the welfare of the people. Renaissance can broadly be defined as the major changes in the socio-cultural paradigms of a society through judicious use of advancing knowledge and learning. It has been characterized by resurgence of art and culture that was hugely patronized by the political powers of that time. Some of the greatest painters, artists, scholars and scientists like Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Botticeli, Raphael, Copernicus, Galileo etc had graced this era with their landmark work in the specified area. The individual fame and development of trade and commerce became the main force that changed the political thinking and consequently the political history of Europe.
Renaissance period had sprung from Italy and had rapidly spread to other parts of Europe. Europe’s political scenario had undergone tremendous transformation during the period with revolutionary ideas that led to the separation of power from the Roman Catholic Church which was the single uniting factor of the time. ‘Renaissance had brought an end for the most part to feudalism, the medieval form of political organization’ (Renaissance). The period saw dramatic changes in the political, social and cultural environment of Europe that was based on scientific and cultural interpretation rather than religious orthodoxy.
The renaissance is also known as an age of enlightenment because of the rebirth of cultural and literary supremacy of the Europe. Indeed, in Carolingian Renaissance, Charlemagne became the main propagator of change and brought together the three major instruments of society. the peasants, nobility and clergy to evolve a new society that is ruled by knowledge, learning and application of the same in their life. Carolingian renaissance is known for uniformity of Christian religion, well defined administration and revival of learning. He helped streamline the administration by introducing military governors and dividing his kingdom into administrative units but was not much concerned with the broader aspect of art and culture as a whole.
The changes in the political, social and cultural environment were based on scientific and cultural interpretation rather than religious orthodoxy. The Carolingian, Macedonian and Islamic renaissance promoted transformation through wider application of learning. The most distinguishing feature of renaissance was the emphasis on learning and preserving history by translating major manuscripts into English. Grammar, syntax and lowercase letters were introduced and used in the translation of all biblical manuscripts into English. Thus, Carolingian renaissance contributed hugely towards refinement of English language and translation of religious texts into English.
The emergence of scholastic institutions was primarily dominated by the theological curricula promoted by the Church to promote religion and ethical values amongst the masses. Initially known as studia or studia generalia, they were institutions of higher education which are today called universities. The curricula in the universities covered wide ranging subjects like music, geometry, arithmetic, grammar, logic, cosmology, metaphysics etc. (Henkins, 2007). Thus, the rise of universities contributed towards intellectual advancements of society and helped liberate people from the constraints of medieval period.
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Reference
Henkins, James (ed). (2007). The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy. NY. Cambridge University Press.
Renaissance. (2009). Retrieved from:

Helmholtz Coils to create zero magnetic field in the laboratory

Helmholtz Coils to create Zero Magnetic Field in Laboratory The traditional purpose of Helmholtz coils has been to create a uniform magnetic field inthe laboratory[1]. A solenoid could easily have been used here but the Helmholtz coil has the added advantage that the process under experimentation is visible to the observer. The basic construction consists of two coaxial coils of equal radii placed so that the distance between their centers is equivalent to their internal radius. The current through the coils can circulate in either the same direction or in opposite directions. If the direction of current flow is the same, then, at the centre of the apparatus, a highly homogenous magnetic field is obtained. Under normal circumstances, the earth exerts its own magnetic field at every point in its surface. By adjusting the strength of the current through the coils, it can arranged to have the magnetic field of the earth completely cancelled out within the Helmholtz coils, thus creating a condition of absolutely zero magnetic field at the centre of the coils. The schematic diagram is shown below:

The axis of the coils are arranged horizontally [2]
The expression for magnetic field at the centre

The Biot Savart law [3] gives the magnetic field at a distance r from a line element dl as
Where,
Note that
By symmetry considerations and the geometry of the coil, we get that

Thus,

Or finally,
Adding the magnetic field contributions due to both the coils, the total magnetic field at the centre becomes:
As for Helmholtz coils the distance between the centers x = a/2,
This is the maximum field strength obtained in the Helmholtz coils and the for a given Helmholtz coil, it is directly proportional to the value of the current i.
If the magnetic field in the laboratory due to the Earth is H, then a zero magnetic field is obtained when:
Thus by passing a current given by the above equation, a condition of zero magnetic fields can be created at the centre of a Helmholtz coil.
Works Cited
[1]Feynman, R. P., Leighton, R. B., &amp. Sands, M. L. (1963). The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Vol II. Addison-Wesley.
[2]Halliday, D., Resnick, R., &amp. Walker, J. (2006). Fundamentals of Physics, Sixth Edition. Wiley.
[3]Sears, F. W., &amp. Zemansky, M. W. (1955). University Physics. Addison-Wesley.

Consciousness and Mind

&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp. “The experiences in which the artist sees his phantasy formations, or more precisely, that peculiar internal seeing itself or bringing to intuition of centaurs, heroic characters, landscapes, and so on, which we contrast to external seeing, to the external seeing that belongs to perception” (Meraud, 27). Husserl is of the opinion that phantasy is quite fairly evolved in the artist.
&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp. While Husserl asserts “aesthetic consciousness” in artists, Noe (2000) argues, "Art can make a needed contribution to the study of perceptual consciousness" (123). He means that artwork of artists can provide us the opportunity to gain a reflective experience. That is how one can do phenomenological investigation.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.
&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp.&nbsp. To put forth his point forward, Noe (2000) illustrates cases of Smith and Serra. Both create metal sculptures appropriate for outdoor installation. While Smith’s works are created based on mathematical or geometrical ratios. Serra’s works are purely experiential. Smith’s creation attempts to combine certain shapes such as terahedrons so as to fill out space. They are demonstrative pieces to show that space can be filled. In contrast, Serra’s pieces depend upon their scale, their milieu and their complexity. Smith’s pieces can be viewed as universal. Smith is more concerned with geometry, form and internal relationships while Serra’s sculpture invokes consciousness (Noe, 2000). He categorically emphasizes that works of some artists do qualify for phenomenological study meaning "Experiential art enables us to do this”.

3D Graphing Engine

Nowadays geometry engines are called Vertex Shaders since they are programmable and can run so-called (vertex) shader programs to compute and animate the geometry of a scene. Every vertex that needs to be calculated can contain a lot of information, such as an x, y, z coordinate (a 3-dimensional position), texture coordinates, Normal Information (what direction the vertex faces), an identifier (which triangle it belongs to), Skinning parameters, lighting values or just about anything else.
However, vertex processing alone does not result in a visible picture.&nbsp. So as to see all the triangles made up of all the vertices that the vertex shaders have calculated, they need to be colored. Certainly, the invisible object that is a result of the geometry processing needs to be “wallpapered” so it becomes visible.&nbsp. To be able to do this, the polygons need to be converted into pixels. this is done during the triangle setup. The pixels are then dealt with in the pixel shaders and pixel pipelines. The color value of a pixel is looked upon a texture. this texture exists in graphics memory as a bitmap that was designed by the 3D artist.&nbsp. Textures can be available in different resolutions. Higher resolution textures look better. however, use more memory space and more memory bandwidth than lower resolution textures.&nbsp. For far away objects, this would not only result in wasted processing cycles, but it could also lead to display anomalies. As a result of this, textures are usually available in different resolutions.&nbsp. If textures of different resolutions are combined on one object then this is referred to as mip-mapping. This mip-mapping can produce visible borders between the two textures of different resolutions, called mipmap banding.&nbsp. Moreover, this mipmap banding can be minimized using different filtering techniques. Filtering means that for every pixel to be colored, more than one texel on the texture is looked up and the average is calculated and applied to the pixel.&nbsp.

Why Geometry has played a central part in Painting

My main aim in this text, however, is to explore the relationships and importance of geometry in painting. In order to better understand these relationships we need to look back in time into the “science of space”. I will aim to include three chapters in this text, the first dealing with the study of geometry, symmetry and their basic, most important properties and its uses in earlier movements of art in order to present the most relevant examples of works into the second chapter which will deal with analysis of works of art (mainly paintings). The third and final chapter will deal with answering the question. “Why geometry has played a central part in painting?”
“It was then that all these kinds of things thus established receive the shapes of the ordering one, through the action of ideas and numbers”- Plato. Plato’s philosophy of the universe was centered on the Deity. He believed that the universe is built out of four elements. earth, fire, water and air (as Empedocles before him), which takes a form of geometrical solids (earth- cube, fire- tetrahedron, water- icosahedron, air- octahedron) which then can brake further into triangles.As mentioned above geometry means earth measure. As we shall see the journey is from the single point into the line, out to the plane, to the third dimension and beyond eventually returning to the point again. Like the elements of its sister subject music, it is an aspect of revelation in a creation myth in itself. Number, music, geometry and cosmology are the four art.

Leonardo da Vinci’s Plan for the ReDesign of Milan

The Renaissance period is characterized mostly by a renewed focus on the symbolism and skill represented in the artworks of the ancient world. This renewed focus on learning and knowledge encouraged the curious Leonardo to explore all his interests in nature and life. Discovering how things work had fascinated him since he was a young boy in the Italian countryside. More than just painting, Leonardo displayed a particular genius in investigating many subjects, constantly learning, observing and making hypotheses that he would test out whenever he could. During his life, da Vinci took time out from his art to re-design cities, sketch out canals and invent war machines. He kept large collections of these sketches that also show his interest in birds and other flying things. These studies led him to investigate different possible types of flying machines and the instruments that they would need aboard. Demonstrating a genius for invention and insightful inquiry centuries ahead of his time, it can be argued that Leonardo da Vinci is as famous as an early engineering genius as he is as an artist.
By all accounts, Leonardo’s interests in science and the arts emerged at the same time from the same source of creative genius. “From a very early age, Leonardo was fascinated by the wonders of nature and, indeed, he learned a great deal by observing nature … The inventions with which, in later years, he would amaze his contemporaries … had roots in that formative period. Biographer Giorgio Vasari reported that from earliest boyhood, Leonardo amused himself by drawing models of machines.”2 His studies included geometry as well as the mechanical workings of gears and winches, human anatomy, military machines, and hydraulic engineering. The movements of air, wind, water, clouds, snow, and rain also&nbsp.interested him as well as the anatomical movements of the birds and animals around him.&nbsp. He drew up plans for urban sanitary developments and structural fortifications and designed several machines that would not be realized for several centuries.

Geometry proj2

be used to find the area of a parallelogram since the rectangle has been obtained by translating a triangular section of the parallelogram without loss of area thereby maintaining the base length and height.
4. How do the base and height of the parallelogram compare to the base and height of the original triangle? Write an expression for the height of the parallelogram in terms of the height, h, of the triangle.
10. Show how you can find an area formula for a kite using a reflection. (hint: Reflect half of the kite across its line of symmetry d1 by folding the kite along d1. How is the area of the triangle formed related to the area of the kite)
2. A company sells cornmeal and barley in cylindrical containers. The diameter of the base of the 6-in-high cornmeal container is 4 in. The diameter of the base of the 4-in-high barley container is 6 in. Which container has the greater surface area? Which container has the greater volume?
3. The roof of a 50 ft circular building is shaped like a cone with a diameter of 40 ft and height 20 ft. What is the surface area of the building and roof together? What is the volume of building and roof together? (5 points)
5. On Sept. 3, 1970, a hailstone with diameter of 5.6 in fell at Coffeyville, KS. It weighed about 0.018 lb/in.3 compared to the normal 0.033 lb/in.3 for ice. About how heavy was this Kansas hailstone? (5 points)
7. Two storage bins are built in the form of rectangular prisms, and the two bins are similar. One stores wheat at a cost of $.15 per bushel, and the other stores corn at a cost of $.20 per bushel. The bin storing the wheat has a square base 80 ft on a side and is 120 ft tall. If the cost of storing the wheat is $8000, and the cost of storing the corn is $36,000, find the height and the length to the nearest whole number of a side of the base of the bin storing corn. (2 points)
9. Two similar cylinders contain juice. The first cylinder has radius 6 in and height 10 in., contains orange

Nepenthes Rafflesiana trap structure

51250 Keywords: Nepenthes Rafflesiana, Pitcher trap Nepenthes Rafflesiana of genus Nepenthes which belong to the family of Nepenthaceae are one of the most famous carnivorous plants having pitcher traps (Slack &amp. Gate, 2000). Nepenthes have a total of more than 100 species with the bulk of species populated along the islands of Borneo and Sumatra (Bonhomme et al., 2011). Nepenthes pitcher plants including Nepenthes Rafflesiana have also developed specific adaptations like all other carnivorous plants due to lack of nutrients. This nutrient deficiency is a result of the habitat in which these plants grow and they are mostly dependant on insect derived nitrogen (Gaume, Gorb &amp. Rowe, 2002). As a result Nepenthes have these pitcher traps in order to catch and trap insects and then getting the nourishment by digestion and absorption. The structural architecture of the traps of Nepenthes Rafflesiana varies according to the geometry and surface features (Gaume et al., 2002). The pitcher trap is generally composed of three distinct parts (Gaume &amp. Di Giusto, 2009). The three parts named as peristome, waxy zone and digestive zone are all involved in their respective functions of attention, capture and digestion. A lid known as operculum is present above the peristome. The lid prevents the rain water from accumulating inside the pitcher and thus helps to prevent nutrient loss. According to Di Guisto et al. (2010) Nepenthes Rafflesiana show heteroblastic development defined by pitcher dimorphism according to their growth and maturity. Terrestrial pitchers or lower pitchers are linked to the young species whereas the aerial or upper pitchers are associated with the mature and climbing life forms. The two pitchers thus also show different characteristics. While the aerial pitchers are elongated, shaped like a trumpet and greenish yellow in colour the terrestrial pitchers are more winged shaped, globular and reddish green in colour. Aerial pitchers have an approximate length of 3-12 inches while terrestrial pitchers are around 3-10 inches long. The pitcher traps mostly develop during summer. Although most leaves have a trap it is not a necessity that a leave must have a pitcher trap. Often due to lack of light, low humidity or difficulties in cultivation might cause a leaf to not develop a pitcher trap. The initial sign of pitcher formation is a swelling on the tendril of a recently formed leaf. Leading towards maturity this minute swelling becomes filled with air and the first sign of colouring appears on it. A few days after the variegation appears, the lid of the pitcher opens and they become operational. In a week time the walls of the pitcher strengthen and they finally become completely mature. The pitcher trap consists of a mouth and a body. A hard, glistening and rounded collar or rim makes up the mouth of the trap (Bauer and Federle, 2009). This rim is frequently furrowed with very apparent and obvious parallel ribs. Each and every rib ends inside the mouth in a very sharp downward direction. The angles created due to this downward pointing, house single nectar secreting glands between them. The body of these traps also varies from pitcher to pitcher. The body is more or less like a cylinder with a rounded base. The lower half of the body is often more bell shaped than the rest of

Rococo Neoclassicism and Romanticism

Rococo, Neo icism (of the late 1700s), and Romanticism: Comparisons and Contrasts The following brief discussion of painting styles will focus on three different schools of painting–Rococo, Neoclassicism (of the late 1700s), and Romanticism. Each school will be defined and an example identified, then the three will be compared and contrasted.
Rococo is best described as ornamented, flowery and sensual. In terms of color pastels and lighter tones were popular. The François Boucher (1703 – 1770), the French painter typifies this style. His portrait of Louise OMurphy, mistress of King Louis XV, commonly known as “Girl Reclining” is an excellent example of this style.1 The colors employed and the lighting portrayed in this portrait are delicate and soft. The womans pose and her nakedness capture the sensuality of the Rococo style.
Neoclassicism as the name implies was an attempt to recapture classical styles, or at least what was perceived to be classical styles, and focused on classical subjects such as Greek and Roman architecture and mythology. Italian Giovanni Paolo Pannini (1691-1765) painted in this style. His “Roma Antica” epitomizes this school of painting.2 It features a cluster of Panninis contemporaries in a classical style building that is full of Graeco-Roman statues. The walls are decorated with pictures and panels featuring the most famous classical ruins, such as the Colosseum.
Romanticism focused on nature in terms of its subjects and portrayed nature as wild, energetic and, even, violent. Its most famous practitioner was the German, Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840).
“Wanderer above the Sea of Fog” (1818) captures this style.3 The individual is small before the sea of fog and his face is hidden. He is insignificant in the face of the wild, violence and mystery of nature.
The subjects of the three styles provide grounds for comparison. Rococo focuses on people, specifically wealthy aristocrats. Neoclassicism portrays ancient culture. and, Romanticism depicts nature and its fury. In some senses the sensuality of Rococo and the focus on nature in Romanticism are similar in their focus on the physical and the senses which contrasts with Neoclassicisms focus on the rational and organized world of the classical civilizations. The colors, haziness and curvilinear styles of Romanticism and Rococo are comparable and contrast with the straight lines, geometry and distinct colors of Neoclassicism.
Works Cited
Boucher, François. “Girl Reclining” (1751). http://www.artvibrations.com/francoisboucher/artfile2.php. Web. Accessed 12 June 2010.
Friedrich, Caspar David. “Wanderer above the Sea of Fog” (1818) http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/his/CoreArt/art/rom_fri_wand.html. Web. Accessed 12 June 2010.
Pannini, Paola “Roma Antica” (1755) http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/p/pannini/roma_ant.html. Web. Accessed 12 June 2010.

Adoption of Knowledge Based Engineering in Automobile Manufacture

This concept note has been prepared for the automobile manufacturing companies stressing the importance of employing Knowledge-Based Engineering systems with the aim of improving their fields of developmental methodologies through a shorter developmental time thus improving the quality of their systems(ARMSTRONG, 2001:24).

Analysis of the Context
The concept of Knowledge-Based Engineering(KBE) is without a doubt very broad. This is because in product development KBE becomes an important tool with the important function of capturing knowledge and enabling for its reuse. For example, a spreadsheet enables the recycling of knowledge by having the ability to effectively implement equations and/or rules. It is for this reason that this concept note lays emphasis on those tools of Knowledge-Based Engineering that function as tools where knowledge is stored in different classes as objects such as Java, C++ and especially takes note of fact that in terms of product prototyping, KBE tools carry out an important role in congruence with geometry engine to effectively put into action the automatic generation of product concept.KBE functions to automate routine and time-consuming tasks which thereby accord employees of companies more time to invest in new innovations and adequately find solutions. However, a knowledge-based system emanating from artificial intelligence(AI) captures expert knowledge and more often than not also generates creative solutions, for which it sometimes referred to as an ‘expert system’.This paper notes that in the development of KBE systems,numerous methods exists but lays particular emphasis on MOKA as a suitable example that could be adopted by SMMT (The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders), as the development process revolves around capturing and formalizing knowledge which does not present challenging difficulties to most manufacturers(HIRZ, 2013:309).
KBE will offer automobile manufacturers the advantage of optimizing product concepts in a much easier way and even importantly guarantee that the process knowledge is therefore stored. However, the disadvantage is that it demands a lot of time to develop the systems.

Traditional and Contemporary Architecture Conflict coexistence or indignation

Simard and Mercier studied the procedure of community building in Quebec City and found that ‘the city produced by post modernity (2) stands out at two different but interdependent levels: as regards changes to the urban form and in the area of planning practices and policies. Respecting the issue of urban form, the contemporary city is beset by a series of social, economic and geographical transformations’. As examples the following facts are referred: ‘the rise of information technologies, the increase in social divisions and the relocating of central activities’. Overall, ‘it appears that the post-modern city is undergoing a process of atomization which, in turn, leads to a crystallizing of differences and enclaves. Seen from a historical perspective, the city becomes a highly complex environment which is constantly being reconstituted’. (Simard, Mercier, 2001, 25).
According to the Sear (1998) in ancient Rome the structure of the public authority the responsible for the state’s architecture was as follows: ‘Roman architects worked for the army, the civil service or were in private practice. We possess a good deal of background evidence about them as well as an entire treatise on the subject, written by Vitruvius in about 23 BC. Amongst other things it is explained how a Roman architect drew up plans, elevations and shaded perspective drawings of his buildings. A skilled draughtsman, he says, ought to be able to produce coloured drawings to convey an impression of the work which he proposes’.
He also found that ‘Geometry is a great help in architecture. It teaches us the use of the rule and compasses, and facilitates the layout and planning of buildings by the use of the set-squares, the level and the plumbline. Moreover by means of optics the light in buildings can be correctly drawn from fixed quarters of the sky. Also it is by

Art style and two artist researches

They wanted to produce two-dimensional canvass and used multiple vantage points. According to Rewald (2001), Picasso and Braque had common favourite instilling musical instruments, bottles, pitchers, glasses, newspapers, playing cards and the human face and figure in their art works. Cubism was not only adopted in paintings, but it was also popular in architecture and sculpture during the twentieth century (rewald, 2001).
Nesic (n.d.) discussed that Cubism was once just an idea before it really became a style. The cubism is an approach to art which wanted to represent the reality of the world in concepts and not about perceptions (Nesic, n.d.). Paul Cezanne is one of the most influential painters during the nineteenth century (Galenson amp. Weinberg 2001). Cezanne enumerated ingredients of cubism which include geometry, simultaneity and passage and tried to introduce the concept of the Fourth Dimension (Nesic, n.d.).
There are two distinct phases of cubism: analytical and synthetic. The Analytic cubists create artworks with multiple and overlapping planes while synthetic cubists produce artworks made of colored papers cut out in shapes (Rewald 2001). Analytical cubism which lasted until 1912 used geometric framework to create a subject image as an overall effect (Cubism, n.d.). Synthetic cubism on the other hand was mainly influenced by the introduction of collages, both simple and bold (Cubism, n.d.). Unlike analytical cubism, this phase is appear to be more abstract but characterized by a more direct, vibrant and attractive style (Cubism, n.d.).
For this paper I will discuss the work of three contemporary cubist painters: Susanna Sharp and Luiza Vizoli. There paintings are characterized by collages of abstract geometric forms which characterized the style of cubism. There subjects are more on human face and musical instruments like the great founders Picasso and Braque.
Luiza Vizoli is a fulltime contemporary professional artist

As usual I don’t understand the following questions (Remake)1 How are the coordinates of the

Question

As usual, I don’t understand the following questions: (Remake)

1.How are the coordinates of the

new point found if it is rotated 90° counterclockwise? How many degrees is that equivalent to if the rotation is clockwise?

2.How are the coordinates of the new point found if it is rotated 180° counterclockwise? How many degrees is that equivalent to if the rotation is clockwise?

3.How would you describe what a rotation is.

4.A triangle has coordinates A (1, 5), B (-2, 1) and C (0, -4). What are the new coordinates if the triangle is dilated with a scale factor of 1/5?

5.A line segment has endpoints P (3, 6) and Q (12, 18) and is dilated so that its new endpoints are P’ (2, 4) and Q’ (8, 12). What is the scale factor? If the length of PQ is 15, what is the length of P’Q’?

6.A triangle has coordinates A (1, 5), B (-2, 1) and C (0, -4). What are the new coordinates if the triangle is rotated 90° clockwise around the origin?

7.How are the coordinates of the new point found if it is rotated 270° counterclockwise? How many degrees is that equivalent to if the rotation is clockwise?

8.How are the coordinates of the new point found if it is dilated with a scale factor of 3?

9.How would you describe what exactly a dilation is (geometry)

Math

As usual I don’t understand the following questions (Remake)1 How are the coordinates of the

Question

As usual, I don’t understand the following questions: (Remake)

1.How are the coordinates of the

new point found if it is rotated 90° counterclockwise? How many degrees is that equivalent to if the rotation is clockwise?

2.How are the coordinates of the new point found if it is rotated 180° counterclockwise? How many degrees is that equivalent to if the rotation is clockwise?

3.How would you describe what a rotation is.

4.A triangle has coordinates A (1, 5), B (-2, 1) and C (0, -4). What are the new coordinates if the triangle is dilated with a scale factor of 1/5?

5.A line segment has endpoints P (3, 6) and Q (12, 18) and is dilated so that its new endpoints are P’ (2, 4) and Q’ (8, 12). What is the scale factor? If the length of PQ is 15, what is the length of P’Q’?

6.A triangle has coordinates A (1, 5), B (-2, 1) and C (0, -4). What are the new coordinates if the triangle is rotated 90° clockwise around the origin?

7.How are the coordinates of the new point found if it is rotated 270° counterclockwise? How many degrees is that equivalent to if the rotation is clockwise?

8.How are the coordinates of the new point found if it is dilated with a scale factor of 3?

9.How would you describe what exactly a dilation is (geometry)

Math

Chemistry 3 questions need help ASAP Will rate! Thank you!Screen

Question

Chemistry 3 questions, need help ASAP, Will rate! Thank you!

  • Attachment 1
  • Attachment 2
  • Attachment 3

There are hybrid orbitals represented by this picture.
They are composed of
P
d
atomic orbitals, corresponding to
hybridization.
(number)
They have an electron pair geometry of
With bond angles of (If more than one bond angle is possible, separate each with a space). ATTACHMENT PREVIEWDownload attachment

A molecule has sped hybridization with 2 lone pairs.
The electron pair geometry of this molecule is:
The geometry of this molecule is:
This molecule will have approximate bond angles of (If more than one bond angle is possible, separate each with a space.): ATTACHMENT PREVIEWDownload attachment
Hybrid Orbitals Hybrid orbitals are formed by combining the valence orbitals on an atom.
There are hybrid orbitals represented by this picture.
They are composed of
P
d
atomic orbitals, corresponding to
hybridization.
(number)
They have an electron pair geometry of
With bond angles of (If more than one bond angle is possible, separate each with a space).
Science