American anthropology has long focused on race as a very powerful and real form of difference and

Question

American anthropology has long focused on race as a very powerful and real form of difference and

discrimination and yet as one that invites new forms of analysis. What was the approach of Boas to race and the use of anthropometry in late 19th century physical anthropology, both through anthropometric studies of U.S. migrants and through the development of the concept of cuure? How does the anthropologist’s own ethnic, racial, or national identity become relevant, explicitly or not, to their method and analysis? (Earlier in the course we discussed this in relation to Mead versus Hurston, and to the work of Kirin Narayan, and we might ask the same question of the authors we engaged at the end of the course, and in particular to Ralph, Hochschild, Catellino, and Shankar.) With the emergence of very public media (mobile phone videos of police killings of African Americans, and gang killings of African Americans, for example, or of shared narratives of having other people cut in line, or of advertising), how do scholars continue to rethink what race is and does, and how forms of inequality are experienced? Many authors in this course and certainly the scholars we discussed in the last three weeks, may be helpful to compare.

Running Head: AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGY American anthropology
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5 May, 2017 1 AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGY
2 American anthropology
The approach of Boas…
Social Science