Aims Impact and Outcome of Integrated Ways of Working in Childrens Services

The need of the hour that could be truly beneficial to the child and the family is a consorted attempt coming from all the agencies involved in it to work together. In this paper, I would like to analyse the process and objectives, impact and outcome of an integrated working style.
A survey of the children and families in need of help is enough to be disillusioned about their pathetic condition. They want a little relief but on the contrary, have to face more trouble. In some cases, the constant intervention of numerous agencies and practitioners literally make it impossible to have some real breather as both the child and the family pass through repetitive processes, questions and tests.
‘There are times that having all different people in my life is too much. I spend a lot of my time up the hospitals. I wish there were fewer appointments and fewer doctors to see.’ (Child quoted in Turner, p.21)
There are such instances where the family of the child is at a loss of whom to go to. And this has been detrimental to the mental and physical well-being of the child. Therefore it calls for the increasing demand for a coordinated way of working between the different agencies. (Stone &amp. Rixon, ch3, p.88-89)
It is important for the agencies to come together and decide upon the ruling ideology and the common goal towards which they would conjointly work. In this particular issue, it is needless to say that the goal is the betterment of the child in all respects. Whatever mode of cooperation and coordination they might adopt all should be child-centric in approach. (Stone &amp. Rixon, ch3, p.90) The practitioners or agency workers should first and foremost prepare themselves to enter into the life of a child needing help and partake of the child’s problems with the sole aim of finding a resolution to alleviate it. The agency representatives must make it a point to listen to their problems, demands and needs.