Agricultural Knowledge and Information System

The readiness of farmers globally to participate in such an effort could be strongly doubted. In many cases, schemes of change throughout the agricultural sector have been proposed however their application usually faces delays either because of the lack of the appropriate knowledge to follow these initiatives or because of the existence of personal interests that impose a different behavior. In this case, the role of the personal values and attitudes becomes major influencing the behavior of farmers towards the suggested plans of change and innovation either in the short or the long term. The current study focuses on the examination of the response of farmers to extension programs and generally to plans for change as proposed by the government and in relation to a particular community. The role of the community in the success of these programs is also examined taking into account that the willingness of farmers to participate in such initiatives can be strongly influenced by the local ethics and values but also by the personal attitudes which can be differentiated at a high level even within the same community. The measures taken by the government for the success of these attempts should be, therefore ‘customized’ in order to meet the needs of each particular community having in mind that the response of farmers to a plan proposed can change after an initial – trial – period. All issues developed above will be examined throughout this paper by reference to specific examples, i.e. cases where extension programs or plans for change were proposed to farmers operating within a particular community.
The support offered by the government can be considered to be helpful towards the application of change plans in various fields within the community but the interest of the community as part of the society is always considered to be of higher importance regardless of the possible positive effects on the local economy.Generally, it could be stated that farmers tend to reject innovative schemes and plans for change related to their activities. Instead, traditional forms of agriculture seem to be preferred by the majority of farmers globally. In order to examine the above issue, Beedell et al. (1999) used the theory of Planned Behaviour as a basis for the evaluation of the behaviour of Bedfordshire farmers.