Abraham lincoln biography

The process of abolishing the slave trade and slavery in the country gained momentum during his reign and this led to the liberation of the American minorities (Denson 31). In this paper, Abraham Lincoln’s life, times as a leader, ideals, struggle for freedom and the view of analysts will be presented. Early life Born in 1809 in Hodgenville Kentucky to Thomas and Nancy Lincoln, Abraham lived in a small village and spent most of his early life working in his parent’s farm. Though growing up as a lone child, Abraham was born with other siblings including a sister Nancy and a brother Thomas, both of whom died while still young. The stay in Kentucky was marred by suppression and suffering as his parents were unable to get title deeds to own their farmland thus forcing them to locate to Indiana (Ferguson 86). The Indiana land ownership law was more accommodative than the one in Kentucky and the state enacted stricter laws on slavery. In Kentucky, slavery and the use of slaves were rife and this contributed to their relocation to Indiana, a state that had the northwest ordinance, which forbade the use of slavery. The Christian faith of Lincoln and his parents within the Baptist church contributed to his early hatred for slave trade and slavery in the state of Kentucky (Holzer 128). …
He later joined the military while in new Salem where he served in the black hawk war of 1832 and served various leadership positions in the military (Ferguson 90). Law and politics As a young American, Abraham developed strong ideals and beliefs in the development and strengthening of the democratic space of the United States. These strong ideological beliefs and view made him grow into one of the most respected members of the Whig party. During his times as an active political activist and pro-democracy crusader, Lincoln met Mary Todd, a daughter of an influential banker in Kentucky, a lady she later married 1842. Lincoln unsuccessfully contested for the representative seat but later won the Illinois representative seat in 1946 forcing him to relocate to Washington DC with his family. During his time in the United States national congress, the southern and northern states were sharply divided over the issue of slavery (Denson 28). The northern strongly opposed the use of slavery as advocated for the use of free labor for production and farming. As a result, the north outlawed slavery and slave trade while the south depended on slave trade for their cotton plantations. As a result, a large population of black slaves were owned and manipulated by southern plantation owners who exposed them to deplorable conditions. The southern also enacted strong pro-slavery laws which provided legal support for the owners of slaves and gave room for the development and growth of slave trade. As a representative of Illinois, Lincoln strongly opposed the use of slaves and the spread of slave trade into the western state. After the end of his term, Lincoln moved to Springfield to set a law firm with his partner William Herndon (Goodwin