A New Concept and Repackaging of Existing Concepts

They are not enthusiastic about their job. This lack of motivation is demonstrated through negative reaction after the training. The employees show pessimism. This indicates unsettled issues. Some employees attend the training but fail to learn for the simple reason that they did not understand the skills, principals and the facts the trainer wanted them to, (DeSimone &amp. Werner 2008). The behavior of the employees reveals that they never had any intention to change in the first place, (McLean &amp. 2010). All this culminates to poor results even after heavy investments in training programs. This happens when organizations ignore the vital aspects of the employees’ welfare. Most of these aspects cannot be addressed in training sessions. In some organizations, the leadership receives an extremely high salary while the ordinary workers receive extremely small salaries, (McLean &amp. 2010).
This difference causes an immense deal of inequality, which kills motivation among workers. My organization evaluates training through a results-oriented model. Improved results reveal that training was well received and understood. This includes improved turnovers and timely achievements of the targets, (DeSimone &amp. Werner 2008).
The use of structured control and experimental groups is a model for evaluating the impact of training, (McLean &amp. 2010). It is in order to train some workers and leave others without training.
The group that receives training is referred to as the experimental group while the group that goes without training is called a control group, (DeSimone &amp. Werner 2008). The composition of these groups is quite random and, therefore similar. Then the relevant indicators of success are taken from both groups before and after the training, (McLean &amp. 2010). If the experimental group performs better them the training was successful. The assumption here is that if the training is considered successful, the organizations can in future a massive and more thorough training to all workers, (McLean &amp. 2010). This can create rivalry among workers, unfair advantage and resentment. This negative effect can affect the motivation of the control group members, (DeSimone &amp. Werner 2008). With proper understanding, and explaining the control group members, can always wait for the next time.