A Fundamental Philosophy of Capitalism Deeply Rooted in the Doctrine of Consumption

The emergence of new social trends further collaborated on the fact that a rise in consumerism. The mass availability of goods and services in most of the industrial economies is therefore considered as one of the leading changes that took place over the period of the last one century as this phenomenon itself brought about significant other changes within these industrial societies also. &nbsp.(Lee, 2000)What is also significant to note that the increase in mass consumption is not just the result of the changes in the technological advancements but rather this is also a result of a fundamental change in the way societies tend to work? Thus the buyer or consumer may be identified in greater perspective as it indicates the interaction between the consumers performs various exchanges with the society. (Fine, 2002). This also means that there is a need for further investigating the nature of the buyer rather than assuming.This report will provide arguments regarding the overall nature of the consumers and will argue that the role of the buyer should not be pre-supposed but rather investigated and analyzed in a greater context.

Commodity Fetishism
Marx’s argument was based on the assumption that the consumers only use those goods that they value thus the use of commodities was generally linked with the value that to be driven. However, this concept is based on two different ideas of use value as well as the exchange value underlying the interaction of labor with the consumers. Thus the value creation process, therefore, is based on the social relations between the products of the labor. It is also, however, critical to note that Marx views the value of the commodity as a utility that can only be enjoyed by utilizing the physical characteristics of the commodity. This concept has, over the period of time, changed as a modern consumer is also believed to be the one who derives utility out of the signs rather than the physical characteristics of the product. The urge for achieving the prestige through possessing any particular commodity, therefore, makes physical characteristics a secondary aspect of value.&nbsp.&nbsp.