19Th foreign policy of ‘partnership’

The United s of America has since the 19th century, articulated a foreign policy of “partnership” with the countries of Latin America. First, define the US position on Latin American affairs, second, describe the role of the US in opposing the democratically elected presidential administration of Salvador Allende in Chile, and ii) in the efforts to remove Fidel Castro from power in Cuba
The relationship that USA had with Latin America can be portrayed as a father-son type of relationship. It was clear that USA had the manifestation to implement Democracy in Latin America as a result of retaliation against communism. USA sought to have superior authority and did what was best in its own interest. This is best manifested in Roosevelt’s aggressive policies as he was looking to impose its dominant supremacy in a world filled with danger. Roosevelt’s attitude and aptitude was the manifestation of the American philosophy itself at that time. Roosevelt firmly believed in progressivism, a concise change that Americans must embrace in order to be supreme. However, this was contradictory as the US picked Salvador Allende, only because they wanted a leader that was handpicked by them. This was due to the fact that picking a Democratic leader could have been risky for the United States in its conquest to keep fighting communism.
The reason Castro was always deemed as more of an enemy than a friend for United States is because of his close ties with communism. It was no surprise that Castro was well-aware of his authority, power, and his close ties with Russia. The American policy of containment continued to extend in local premises, which meant to remove Castro at any cost. &nbsp.From Kennan’s perspective, an ideologist and a propagator of Democracy- it was a dangerous policy as it flared tensions between two superpowers. It also initiated the ruthless intention of the USA to build up arms and support dictatorships to fight anti-communism. The ultimate goal went from containment to overthrowing a regime. However, policy was a success as it did halt Soviet expansionism as democracy prevailed.&nbsp. The risks that were implemented with this policy were too high compared to the benefits and could have been potentially avoided.
Works Cited
Gaddis, John Lewis.&nbsp.The Cold War: a new history. New York: Penguin Press, 2005. Print.